Left to Right: Gail Peter Borden, AIA; Amy J. Slattery, AIA; Kiel Moe, AIA; Thomas J. Trenolone, AIA; Jack Baumann, AIA; Sara Beardsley, AIA; Sanford E. Garner, AIA; Steven Dwyer, AIA; Sean Stadler, AIA; Christopher Herr, AIA. Not pictured: Jennifer T. Knudsen, AIA

Left to Right: Gail Peter Borden, AIA; Amy J. Slattery, AIA; Kiel Moe, AIA; Thomas J. Trenolone, AIA; Jack Baumann, AIA; Sara Beardsley, AIA; Sanford E. Garner, AIA; Steven Dwyer, AIA; Sean Stadler, AIA; Christopher Herr, AIA. Not pictured: Jennifer T. Knudsen, AIA

Credit: Noah Kalina

Gail Peter Borden, AIA; Amy J. Slattery, AIA; Kiel Moe, AIA; Thomas J. Trenolone, AIA; Jack Baumann, AIA; Sara Beardsley, AIA; Sanford E. Garner, AIA; Steven Dwyer, AIA; Sean Stadler, AIA; Christopher Herr, AIA. Jennifer T. Knudsen, AIA

“All architectural careers are built upon the foundation of previous generations. If we believe in the importance of supporting the long-term needs of society, we must believe in supporting the next generation of architects,” says Chester A. Widom, FAIA, 2011 Chancellor, College of Fellows, and jury member for the AIA Institute Honors for Young Architects. Since 1993, the AIA has recognized the contributions of architects who, although they’ve been licensed for fewer than 10 years, have made significant contributions to the profession through built work and leadership.

The 11 winners this year represent a cross-country group with a diverse range of interests. They support sustainable practices and community development. They research, teach, and mentor. Looking at the work, Widom is optimistic about the future of the profession: “Based upon the quality of the submissions, we have nothing to worry about. Architecture will be in excellent hands.”

Read more about each winner at the AIA's website.