Launch Slideshow

Esto Gallery: The Great Parking Garages

Esto Gallery: The Great Parking Garages

  • Miami Parking Garage, Miami

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    Robert Law Weed and Associates
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    This 1949 garage is one of Weed’s contributions to the master plan for the University of Miami; the school has one of the first campuses in the country with exclusively Modern buildings.

  • Miami Parking Garage, Miami

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/Slide%202%20-%20Weed%20Miami_tcm20-939347.jpg

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    Robert Law Weed and Associates
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    Robert Law Weed’s Bauhaus-inspired Miami split-level garage.

  • Temple Street Parking Garage, New Haven, CT

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    Paul Rudolph
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    In 1962, Paul Rudolph, then the dean of the Yale School of Architecture, designed this Temple Street Garage in New Haven, Conn. In Rudolph’s obituary, The New York Times called it “a dynamic horizontal composition of concrete” that was “the first design since Frank Lloyd Wright’s that sought to create a place of dignity for the car.”

  • Temple Street Parking Garage, New Haven, CT

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/Slide%204%20-%20Rudolph%20New%20Haven_tcm20-939356.jpg

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    Paul Rudolph
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    The 700-foot-long Brutalist structure holds 1,300 cars. From its top floor, under concrete cobra lights, you can see the steeples of the New Haven Green.

  • Temple Street Parking Garage, New Haven, CT

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/Slide%205%20-%20Rudolph%20New%20Haven_tcm20-939357.jpg

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    Paul Rudolph
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    In an interview with John Wesley Cook, Rudolph said of his Temple Street garage: “The one in New Haven comes from the design of throughways. Most parking garages are merely skeletal structures which didn't get any walls. They are just office building structures with the glass left out. I wanted to make a building which said it dealt with cars and movement. I wanted there to be no doubt that this is a parking garage.”

  • Macy’s, Queens, New York

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    Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    This innovative 1965 design by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill for a Macy’s in Queens ringed the circular store with parking, so that shoppers could more directly access their department of choice.

  • Macy’s, Queens, New York

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    Ezra Stoller © Esto

    Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
    Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto

    Customers enter and exit the store via helical ramps in these twin cylindrical structures.

  • Marina City, Chicago

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    Bertrand Goldberg
    Photographer: Susan Carr © Esto

    Marina City, Bertrand Goldberg’s 65-story mixed-use Chicago towers with scalloped edges and a corncob-like facade, were once the tallest reinforced concrete structures in the world. From the exterior, the lower floors of parking ramps are indistinguishable from the apartments above. Completed in 1965, Marina City is now home to the House of Blues concert hall.

  • 1111 Lincoln Road, Miami

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    Herzog & de Meuron
    Photographer: David Sundberg © Esto

    Herzog & de Meuron’s garage, which has hosted weddings and bar mitzvahs, is populated with a menagerie of million-dollar sculptures. Its developer, contemporary art collector Robert Wennet, also commissioned a rooftop penthouse.

  • 1111 Lincoln Road, Miami

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    Herzog & de Meuron
    Photographer: David Sundberg © Esto

    A dizzying precipice on the Lincoln Road garage

During the last five years, Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron has designed a shimmering copper-clad art museum in San Francisco, a postmodern art gallery in Madrid, an iconic 90,000-seat Olympic stadium in Beijing—and, most recently, a Miami parking garage. It may seem strange for a Pritzker-winning firm such as Herzog & de Meuron to entertain a commission in the seemingly gray, utilitarian netherworld of public parking. Yet in Miami, where a zoning regulation limits street parking and makes garages highly profitable, the structures have become a commission du jour. Along with designs by noted architects and firms such as Enrique Norton, Arquitectonica, Perkins+Will, Zaha Hadid, FAIA, and Frank Gehry, FAIA, Herzog & de Meuron’s parking deck constitutes a revival that’s the inverse of Bilbao: in the Spanish seaport, one vibrant building revitalized a glum city. Here, a vibrant city has revitalized the potentially glummest kind of building. It’s a parking-garage renaissance that recalls a pantheon of innovative designs from decades past. Some fanciful ventures, such as Frank Lloyd Wright’s spiraling ziggurat designed for Maryland’s Sugarloaf Mountain, or Konstantin Melnikov’s 1,000-car structure intended to span the Seine, never made it off the boards. Here’s our look at the Esto images of four historic projects that did, as well as Herzog & de Meuron’s new Miami rendition.

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