• Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Derwin Broughton, AIA
A project architect at the Dallas-based firm KAI Texas, Broughton has distinguished himself in his early career through his civic leadership. He is the current chair of AIA Dallas’s Young Architects Forum, and has worked with such groups as the National Organization of Minority Architects. “He has a great understanding of what it means to be a community leader and practicing architect,” the judges said. “Derwin is a great example of the citizen-architect.”






  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Andrew Caruso, AIA
Caruso has developed an eye for emerging architects and honed his professional development skills as the head of Intern Development and Academic Outreach for Gensler in the firm’s Washington, D.C., office. He works closely with Gensler’s chief executives to guide the firm’s strategy for developing talent. The judges lauded Caruso for “insight and provocation” that have helped advance architecture. “In a few short years, he has created a body of work that has had a profound impact on our profession.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Katherine Darnstadt, AIA
As the founder and principal of Latent Design in Chicago, Darnstadt has emphasized a community-based, participatory design process that melds architecture and community development. Her firm has made pro bono work a significant part of its core mission. “She embraces her latitude as a practitioner to create solutions for clients that go beyond a building, and that includes academic curricula, place-making strategies, and policy changes related to food access,” said the judges.





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Susannah C. Drake, AIA
Drake is the founding principal of Dlandstudio in Brooklyn, N.Y., an interdisciplinary practice that has explored ecological solutions to rising sea levels. The firm’s Gowanus Canal Sponge Park in Brooklyn, which helps clean contaminated water, was an innovative reimagining of a Superfund site. Said the judges: “She has an energetic, intelligent, and collaborative approach to urban design, and her public projects have greatly contributed to our understanding of, and potential solutions to, the challenge of climate change and rising seas.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Matthew Dumich, AIA
A project manager with Valerio Dewalt Train & Associates in Chicago, Dumich has contributed to the firm with his work on a wide range of residential, institutional, and mixed-use projects, as well as through his contributions to professional development. He co-founded AIA Chicago Bridge, a mentoring program that partners emerging architects with local fellows. It “bodes well for our profession that we have such dedicated commitment, expertise, maturity, and ambition in such a young architect and professional,” said the judges.





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

John Dwyer, AIA
By the time Dwyer founded his eponymous firm, John Dwyer Architect, in Minneapolis in 2010, he had already compiled an enviable résumé. Most notably, in 2007, he founded a design studio in post-Katrina New Orleans and provided pro bono services to more than 60 households in the 9th Ward. Said the judges, “His leadership in restoring parts of the 9th Ward in New Orleans is inspiring and demonstrates his strong commitment to designing for the public interest.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Eric Reid Hoffman, AIA
A professor of practice in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, and co-director of the firm Patterhn, Hoffman seamlessly moves between the academic and professional worlds. His mentorship of students often continues beyond graduation. And his own work pushes the boundaries of systems integration and building technology. The judges lauded him for his “design leadership, ability to communicate, and robust skill-set,” and called him “an outstanding professor, designer, and mentor.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Thomas Hussey, AIA
Hussey has attempted to bridge the gap between architecture and urban planning in a series of high-profile projects that he has worked on as an architect in Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s Chicago office. He is the chief designer for the Beijing Bohai Innovation City master plan, an innovative new approach to transit-oriented development in China. “An accomplished leader in a new generation of city designers, he exemplifies what our profession needs to meet its tremendous global responsibility,” said the judges.






  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Virginia Elaine Marquardt, AIA
Marquardt has distinguished herself as an architect at the DLR Group with her leadership, securing a position on the firm’s K–12 Forum. She has also distinguished herself with her commitment to emerging professionals, helping to launch DLR’s intern development program and introducing the most recent iteration of the program to the firm’s Santa Monica, Calif., office. Said the judges: “An outstanding example of the young professional we often talk about when we describe this group as the Institute’s, and the profession’s, best hope for the future.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Rachel Minnery, AIA
Minnery, an architect with Environmental Works, a Seattle-based firm, has distinguished herself with her disaster relief work. The co-founder of Architects Without Borders Seattle, she has organized post-disaster building assessment missions in the U.S. and Haiti. In 2005, she helped train Mississippi state officials to assess Hurricane Katrina damage. “Rachel exemplifies the ideal of an architect thoroughly involved in community activism, reaching out to support communities in crisis,” said the jury.





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Deepika Padam, AIA
The principal of Blend Architecture in San Francisco, Padam can point to numerous leadership positions that reflect her commitment to sustainable design practices and young professionals. She founded the Emerging Professionals/Young Architects Forum at AIA Las Vegas, served as president of USGBC Nevada, and was the communications adviser for the AIA Young Architects Forum from 2011 to 2012. “In addition to being a natural leader, she has compassion and integrity, and is a great asset to the profession,” said the jury.





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Alissa D. Luepke Pier, AIA
As the principal architect at A.D.L. Pier Design in Minneapolis, Luepke Pier has grown her practice through dozens of residential and urban design projects. She has also embraced the citizen-architect role, serving as commissioner of the Minneapolis Board of Adjustment, and as a commissioner on the city’s planning commission. Said the jury: “Dedicated and service oriented, with seemingly limitless amounts of energy, she brings the practice of professional architecture to life.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Brett Charles Taylor, AIA
A project manager in Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s Chicago office, Taylor has earned praise both for his ability to foster an efficient, smooth construction process, as well as the countless hours that he has spent volunteering for Rebuilding Together Metro Chicago, a national nonprofit organization that helps to improve the homes and communities of elderly, disabled, and low-income residents. The jury described him as “a promising young architect who exhibits exceptional skill, knowledge, leadership, and commitment in every aspect of his professional career.”





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Lucas Tryggestad, AIA
As an associate director and studio head in Skidmore, Owings & Merrill’s Chicago office, Tryggestad is helping to create a new project methodology to define metrics for carbon reduction, energy efficiency, and water conservation. His commitment to sustainable design extends to his work with Retrofit Chicago’s Commercial Building Initiative, which looks to increase energy efficiency in commercial buildings. “He has an enthusiastic dedication to the profession, with impressive community involvement that is only enhanced by his positive attitude and caring approach to all he touches,” said the jury.





  • Image

    Credit: Peter Arkle

Jennifer A. Workman, AIA
A project leader with Good Fulton & Farrell Architects in Dallas, Workman has collaborated on such projects as the Perot Museum of Nature and Science, as well as several large-scale retail developments. She is a former chair of the Young Architects Forum Advisory Committee. “Her dedication to the profession has been extraordinary,” said the judges, who noted her volunteer work to raise funds for scholarships for underprivileged youth, as well as her involvement with the Family Place, a nonprofit that supports homeless women.





Jury
Norman L. Koonce, FAIA (chair) McLean, Va.; Albert W. Rubeling, FAIA Rubeling & Associates, Towson, Md.; Ronald L. Skaggs, FAIA HKS, Dallas; John Sorrenti, FAIA JRS Architect, Mineola, N.Y.; William J. Stanley III, FAIA Stanley Love-Stanley, Atlanta