Architecture Continuing Education

 
 

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Technical white papers, continuing education courses, videos, and other materials for A/E/C professionals, from building product manufacturers and other industry stakeholders.

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Technical white papers, continuing education courses, videos, and other materials just for architects, from building product manufacturers and other industry stakeholders.

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Stand-alone informational websites produced by building product manufacturers and other industry stakeholders.

 
 
 

Continuing Education Courses

Continuing Education for Architects

Architect CEUniversity, a division of Hanley Wood University, is the premier destination for design professionals seeking continuing education and training opportunities. We offer dozens of sponsored courses in partnership with the American Institute of Architects, the American Society of Landscape Architects, the U.S. Green Building Council, and other organizations. Browse courses below, or click on the Architect CEUniversity logo at left to visit our dedicated continuing education website.

 
 
 

Latest Courses

  • Benefits of Daylight and Fresh Air in Residential Design

    1 LU HSW

    Through this course you will learn how skylights can contribute and provide the benefits of natural ventilation, daylight and energy efficiency to ensure good health and wellbeing in residential applications. Indoor climate combines all the elements of temperature, humidity, lighting, air quality and ventilation in residential buildings. Most of these elements relate closely to energy balance, health and comfort effects on building occupants. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2014
    Subject(s):
    Skylights, Design
    Sponsor:
    Velux
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • High Performance Precast Concrete Building Enclosures (PRINT)

    1 LU

    When you ask architects today about some of their biggest challenges; and building enclosure design is usually at, or towards the top of the list. New and more stringent codes are requiring designers to have a deeper understanding of enclosure systems. High performance building designs are becoming essential to meet new code requirements, as well as the expectations of funding entities, owners, and developers. State-of-the-art building designs require high performance building materials and building enclosure systems. High performance materials must be efficient and versatile in use and in operation, as well as durable, resilient, and capable of protecting buildings and building occupants from weather extremes, natural and man-made hazards, and environmental concerns. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2014
    Subject(s):
    Building Envelope, Building Performance, Concrete
    Sponsor:
    PCI
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Re-Thinking Steel - A Logical Choice for High-Rise Residential Design (PRINT)

    1 LU

    For those involved in the design and construction of high-rise residential buildings, it is clear that fundamental design decisions need to be made in order to address a range of building criteria. A design program is defined in consultation with the owner or developer of the property to determine the intended market or occupancy mix. That feeds into the overall design of the individual living units, including features and amenities to be preferred or avoided. With this conceptual framework in hand, the design team can then start to shape and define the appropriate building. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2014
    Subject(s):
    Steel, Multifamily Building, Architecture
    Sponsor:
    Steel Institute of New York (SINY)
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Up and Running: Starting Your Architecture Business (PRINT)

    1 LU

    As the economy warms up, a new wave of entrepreneurial-minded architects is redefining the profession by stepping up to start their own practices. Are you a candidate? Here are the basics you need to know to advance your career as a successful independent designer. Take the course.

    Posted:
    December 2014
    Subject(s):
    Architects, Business
    Sponsor:
    Graphisoft
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • An Introduction to ETFE Architecture (PRINT VERSION)

    1 LU

    Tensile structures have been used for thousands of years. Their simplicity and efficiency have brought about a recent increased awareness of, and demand for, tensile architecture. Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene, or ETFE, is a relatively new product within the tensile membrane industry in the United States, and it is growing in popularity. It is a fluorine based plastic that was developed to be strong across a wide range of temperatures and be highly resistive to corrosion. This course provides a brief background on the following: ETFE architecture; the benefits of ETFE structures over traditional building techniques; identifying the complete design through construction process for creating an ETFE structure; as well as learning how to select the correct ETFE system and the key properties and performance measures of each. Take the course.

    Posted:
    October 2014
    Subject(s):
    Architecture
    Sponsor:
    Birdair
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Managing Concrete Subfloor Moisture With Wood Flooring

    1 LU

    This course will look at the importance of managing concrete subfloor moisture to prevent wood flooring issues and will cover some flooring issues related to excess moisture, from the subfloor to the flooring itself. Take the course.

    Posted:
    October 2014
    Subject(s):
    Flooring, Concrete Slabs and Floors, Wood
    Sponsor:
    Franklin International
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • From Idea to Icon - Designing and Building with Tensile Architecture (PRINT VERSION)

    1 LU

    Tensile structures date back to the early nomadic period when people required shelter that was lightweight and portable, yet structurally sound enough to withstand harsh weather. Today, the applications and capabilities of tensile structures have evolved into permanent structures such as retail centers and institutional facilities, including museums and grandiose stadiums. This course will look at the unique visual character of tensile membrane and give designers, architects and engineers the ability to experiment with form and create exciting new solutions to conventional design problems. Take the course.

    Posted:
    October 2014
    Subject(s):
    Architecture, Design
    Sponsor:
    Birdair
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Compression-Seal Technology: A Sustainable Solution for High-Performance Windows and Doors (Print Course)

    1 LU

    Recent changes in energy standards and codes, and federal and voluntary initiatives, are transforming the entire building landscape. In the past, a variety of different state and local codes have existed but there is now a trend towards increasing the standardization of even more stringent codes. Window and door systems require increasingly higher performance in order to achieve the new codes, standards and mandates. There are a great number of fenestration solutions available in the market, not all of which fulfill the required performance specifications. Architects and engineers will need to identify and specify high-performance window systems that meet the new energy performance criteria. High-performance windows and doors with compression-seal technology deliver solutions for energy, noise, security, blast, comfort and other challenges. Take the course.

    Posted:
    October 2014
    Subject(s):
    Windows, Doors
    Sponsor:
    Amerimax
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Luxury Kitchen Ventilation: Healthy Indoor Air With Style

    1 LU HSW

    This course discusses the impacts of cooking on indoor air quality, and how those negative impacts can be lessened by proper ventilation. We’ll discuss what to look for in specifying a ventilation system, and how to specify the best system for the situation. And then finally, we’ll take a look at the design options available. The latter topic, the design factor, is sometimes the only thing considered. In this course, it’s the final issue we look at. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2014
    Subject(s):
    Kitchen, Ventilation
    Sponsor:
    Sub-Zero
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Understanding the Benefits of Non-Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic Wall Panels

    1 LU HSW

    Traditional fiberglass reinforced plastic wall panels (FRP’s) have been used since the 1960’s as interior wall and ceiling panels. A newer product, non-fiberglass reinforced plastic wall panels, improves on the benefits of FRP’s such as mold, bacteria, moisture, chemical and stain resistance, and is also a sustainable product with fewer health hazards. This course will compare the two products, as well as describe the importance of using non-fiberglass reinforced plastic wall panels to mitigate moisture issues. The course will also cover appropriate applications for the material. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2014
    Subject(s):
    Walls, Panels
    Sponsor:
    Parkland Plastics
    Certification(s):
    AIA

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Questions?

Contact support at Hanley Wood University here: HWUniversity@hanleywood.com