Continuing Ed

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Architect is pleased to partner with Hanley Wood University, the leading CEU destination for Architects and Construction professionals.  Below please find a broad sampling of courses from Hanley Wood University.  Their continuing education directory offers hundreds of courses, created by leading specialists, for the following certification programs: AIA, AIA/HSW, ASLA, GBCI, IDCEC, NAHB, NARI, and NKBA. 
Enroll, take a course, and earn credit – all year long, any time of day or night.

Results

  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Rethinking Wood as a Material of Choice: Costs Less, Delivers More (Print Course)

    Designers today are finding new possibilities in one of the oldest building materials on earth. Wood has always been valued for its beauty, abundance and practicality, but many of wood’s inherent characteristics are rising to very current challenges. Wood’s traditional values and newest technologies meet in the projects presented in this course, illustrating the advantages of wood to in four areas: cost-effectiveness in a wide range of projects; adaptability for use in challenging, visionary new designs; lower environmental costs throughout its life cycle, from its source in renewable, carefully managed forests, through an energy-efficient service life, and often on to a new, recycled and reimagined use; and a unique human-nature connection that has always been intuitive, but is now being documented in research.

    Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Green Building and Wood Products (Print Course)

    With growing pressure to reduce the carbon footprint of the built environment, building designers are increasingly being called upon to balance functionality and cost objectives with reduced environmental impact. Wood can help to achieve that balance. This continuing education course examines key green building rating programs and how wood building materials and components are rated within each. Increased reliance on LCA and environmental product declarations (EPDs), and the implications for wood construction, are also explored.

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  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Chemistry and the Building Process for Architects (Print Course)

    This article highlights how chemistry enhances performance of key products in the building industry to meet the expectations of architects, designers, commercial builders and building occupants. This learning unit also addresses concerns around chemicals used in building and construction and reviews the distinct differences between risk, hazard and exposure when it comes to chemicals in building products. Finally, this article addresses the future of chemicals and building materials, along with the challenges of introducing new products, and how chemistry will continue to provide enhanced products in the building industry. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Building Retrofits: Getting the Whole Picture on Window Replacement (Print Version)

    When undertaking a significant energy retrofit project, architects employ various tools to help them successfully identify potential areas for improvement. Some of the most valuable assets in an architect’s toolbox are companies that provide building analysis. A building analysis service team that can completely test, measure, and document the gaps and opportunities for energy savings in a building will provide the architect with a wealth of information and resources needed to successfully complete the project. However, when it comes to windows, traditional building analysis services often fail to deliver a complete evaluation of the building, and miss several of the key components that can impact energy use. Besides the energy efficiency rating of the window - other considerations like occupant comfort and air tightness should be included when designing a window replacement strategy during a retrofit project. Architects who choose a building analysis service that provides a complete evaluation of the windows and fenestration in the building will have better information, more options, and a greater chance of creating a successful energy efficient design that provides a faster return-on-investment for property owners. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Sustainable Choices in Luxury Fenestrations (Print Version)

    Luxury homes offer the architect, builder and buyer a unique opportunity to create dwellings that are distinctive, comfortable and aesthetically pleasing. Increasingly, sustainable design is becoming more important to luxury home owners. Opulence does not need to be wasteful of natural resources. Even large floor plans can prove to be conservation-minded if the architect, builder and homeowner decide to pursue a “green” route. Designing a luxury home that is environmentally responsible must take into account many aspects of the building process including design, construction practices, air sealing and insulation, and material selection. Windows sit at the crossroads of sustainable material selection and luxury design. The right window can reduce energy use, contribute to green building goals and also provide the touch of quality and beauty a luxury home requires. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Floodproofing Non-Residential Buildings (Print Version)

    Almost everyone lives in a potential flood zone. In addition to the hurricanes and catastrophic floods that make national headlines, a damaging flood is happening somewhere in the U.S. every day, even in desert regions, caused by local heavy rainfall, dam failures, land development runoff, drainage problems, inland remnants of tropical storms and many other conditions. Nationwide, flooding is the leading cause of deaths related to severe weather, and it wipes out businesses, too. According to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), almost 40 percent of small businesses never reopen their doors after a flood disaster, because just a few inches of water can cause tens of thousands of dollars in damage. Building in floodplains, or Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA) designated by FEMA, is strictly regulated by the NFIP, the International Building Code, ASCE national reference standards, and by local community codes, all of which are discussed in this course. Deciding on a non-residential building’s floodproofing strategy will have a direct connection to the project’s cost, to the safety of the building’s occupants and the survivability of the building itself, and to the risk of liability for the designer and builder in case of flood damage. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Specifying Sustainable Insulation for Thermal and Acoustic Control (Print Version)

    Archeological research reveals that insulating our homes using natural, renewable materials like fiber, wool, straw and cork, is actually as old as human history. And with good reason. Insulation is perhaps the most cost effective, straightforward path to peak functionality in the design and construction of buildings. And while many petroleum and chemical-based insulation strategies have risen up over the decades, we may be circling back around in a post-petroleum world to prefer insulation made from renewable, recycled and recyclable materials. This course describes the specification and use of these insulation materials. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Multigenerational Restrooms: Better Designs for One and All (Print Version)

    Multigenerational design, also known as transgenerational design, is an increasingly important aspect of universal design and a major contemporary trend mirroring the dramatic societal and economic changes of the last decades. In particular, public restrooms illustrate these multigenerational trends because they serve such diverse populations. Designing them successfully is a growing challenge for architects and facility owners. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    IDCEC 0.1 CEU
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Luxury Kitchen Ventilation: Healthy Indoor Air With Style

    This course discusses the impacts of cooking on indoor air quality, and how those negative impacts can be lessened by proper ventilation. We’ll discuss what to look for in specifying a ventilation system, and how to specify the best system for the situation. And then finally, we’ll take a look at the design options available. The latter topic, the design factor, is sometimes the only thing considered. In this course, it’s the final issue we look at. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Understanding the Benefits of Non-Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic Wall Panels

    Traditional fiberglass reinforced plastic wall panels (FRP’s) have been used since the 1960’s as interior wall and ceiling panels. A newer product, non-fiberglass reinforced plastic wall panels, improves on the benefits of FRP’s such as mold, bacteria, moisture, chemical and stain resistance, and is also a sustainable product with fewer health hazards. This course will compare the two products, as well as describe the importance of using non-fiberglass reinforced plastic wall panels to mitigate moisture issues. The course will also cover appropriate applications for the material. Enroll

Projects

Buffalo Bayou Park Buffalo Bayou Park

Page, SWA Group

Prism Tower Prism Tower

Christian de Portzamparc

CitySpaces MicroPAD CitySpaces MicroPAD

Panoramic Interests

Burrawong House Burrawong House

Bijl Architecture

S:t Erik Indoor Park S:t Erik Indoor Park

Utopia Arkitekter

The Big Bend The Big Bend

Oiio Studio

Lincoln Park House Lincoln Park House

HBRA Architects

Bosjes Chapel Bosjes Chapel

Steyn Studio

One Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza One Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza

Studios Architecture

1 Hillside 1 Hillside

Tim Cuppett Architects

Concrete at Alserkal Avenue Concrete at Alserkal Avenue

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

Shaolin Flying Monks Temple Shaolin Flying Monks Temple

Mailitis Architects

New York at Its Core New York at Its Core

Studio Joseph

Oberholz Mountain Hut Oberholz Mountain Hut

Peter Pichler Architecture

Giacomo Zanella Primary School Giacomo Zanella Primary School

Giulia de Appolonia

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