Continuing Ed

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Architect is pleased to partner with Hanley Wood University, the leading CEU destination for Architects and Construction professionals.  Below please find a broad sampling of courses from Hanley Wood University.  Their continuing education directory offers hundreds of courses, created by leading specialists, for the following certification programs: AIA, AIA/HSW, ASLA, GBCI, IDCEC, NAHB, NARI, and NKBA. 
Enroll, take a course, and earn credit – all year long, any time of day or night.

Results

  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Rethinking Wood as a Material of Choice: Costs Less, Delivers More (Print Course)

    Designers today are finding new possibilities in one of the oldest building materials on earth. Wood has always been valued for its beauty, abundance and practicality, but many of wood’s inherent characteristics are rising to very current challenges. Wood’s traditional values and newest technologies meet in the projects presented in this course, illustrating the advantages of wood to in four areas: cost-effectiveness in a wide range of projects; adaptability for use in challenging, visionary new designs; lower environmental costs throughout its life cycle, from its source in renewable, carefully managed forests, through an energy-efficient service life, and often on to a new, recycled and reimagined use; and a unique human-nature connection that has always been intuitive, but is now being documented in research.

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  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Green Building and Wood Products (Print Course)

    With growing pressure to reduce the carbon footprint of the built environment, building designers are increasingly being called upon to balance functionality and cost objectives with reduced environmental impact. Wood can help to achieve that balance. This continuing education course examines key green building rating programs and how wood building materials and components are rated within each. Increased reliance on LCA and environmental product declarations (EPDs), and the implications for wood construction, are also explored.

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  • Course Credits
    AIA 1.0 LU
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Evaluating the Carbon Footprint of Wood Buildings (Print Course)

    Worldwide, there has been increasing focus on the carbon footprint of buildings and recognition that design professionals are uniquely positioned to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by creating high-performance structures. This course examines the environmental impacts of wood products—from the global scale of the world’s forests to the individual scale of efficient, adaptable, and innovative buildings—using real-world examples from two U.S. carbon calculators as well as the latest research on LCA.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    The Impact of Wood Use on North American Forests (Print Course)

    As green building has evolved beyond its initial emphasis on energy efficiency, greater attention has been given to the choice of structural materials and the degree to which they influence a building’s environmental footprint. Increasingly, wood from sustainably managed forests is viewed as a responsible choice—for a number of reasons. Wood grows naturally by harnessing energy from the sun, absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. It is renewable and a carbon sink, and outperforms other materials in terms of embodied energy, air and water pollution, and other impact indicators.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Mid-Rise Wood Construction: A Cost-Effective and Sustainable Choice For Achieving High-Performance Goals (Print Course)

    Cost-effective, code-compliant and sustainable, mid-rise wood construction is gaining the attention of design professionals nationwide, who see it as a way to achieve higher density housing at lower cost—while reducing the carbon footprint of their projects. Yet, many familiar with wood construction for two- to four-story residential structures are not aware that the International Building Code (IBC) allows wood-frame construction for five stories and more in building occupancies that range from business and mercantile to multi-family, military, senior, student and affordable housing.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Wood and Indoor Environment - Creating Beneficial Spaces for Living, Working, Well-Being (Print Course)

    The objectives of sustainable design are broader than just environmental effects, having come to embrace issues of human health and performance. Many factors influence whether a building has a positive or negative impact on its occupants. This course highlights remarkable buildings where the use of wood as a structural or finish material has made a unique contribution, with a focus on indoor air quality, acoustics, physical health, and a natural, positive human response to wood that has always been intuitive, but is increasingly being proven by research and experience.

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  • Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Propane as a Solution to Meeting Code and Above-Code Programs – Using High Efficiency Propane Systems as a Compliance Strategy

    Nothing is driving greater change in the home building industry than energy efficiency, but prior to 2015 the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) didn't address mechanical equipment such as furnaces and water heaters. The 2015 IECC now includes a new compliance path called the Energy Rating Index allowing builders more choices in how to meet the energy code.

    In addition, builders can determine how to use propane to their maximum advantage under the ERI pathway by determining their homes’ Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index. The HERS Index predicts the energy performance of a home versus a "typical new home" benchmarked at a score of 100.

    This course will take a closer look at how high efficiency propane equipment such as furnaces and water heaters provide flexibility in meeting 2015 IECC standards and help reduce a home’s HERS Index, in addition to helping projects gain points in above-code programs such as LEED and the National Green Building Standard.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Architectural Paving Systems: Advancements in Surface Technologies and Finishes (print)

    Not all concrete paving materials are created equal. To withstand harsh environments and heavy use with minimal color and surface wear, paving products should employ the latest technologies and manufacturing processes available. This will ensure that the architect, landscape architect, or engineer is specifying highly durable concrete pavers. Today, the range of color and finish options are greater than ever before, allowing the designer to explore creative options with a supportive manufacturer. This course explores how to recognize, design, and build with the highest quality concrete pavers available in the industry. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA 1.0 LU
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    LEED (O+M 1.0 AP O+M
    LEED (ND) 1.0 AP ND
    LEED (Homes) 1.0 AP HOMES
    LEED (BD+C) 1.0 AP BD+C
    LEED (ID+C) 1.0 AP ID+C
    LEED (Green) 1.0 GREEN
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    LEED v4 - Technical Improvements

    This course takes a closer look at LEEDv4 and the importance of the technical improvements that have been made. This course also discusses the market trends and building performance and how these have both influenced LEEDv4. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA 2.0 LU
    GBCI (CE) 2.0 CE Hour
    LEED (O+M 2.0 AP O+M
    LEED (ND) 2.0 AP ND
    LEED (Homes) 2.0 AP HOMES
    LEED (BD+C) 2.0 AP BD+C
    LEED (ID+C) 2.0 AP ID+C
    LEED (Green) 2.0 GREEN
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Introducing LEED v4: Lessons from the LEED v4 Beta Program

    This course looks at how the Beta Program was used to help improve LEEDv4 and the user experience. It looks closely at a few projects that were submitted through the Beta Program and compares and contrasts how buildings would be certified in the newest version of LEED, as opposed to the previous version. This course will also cover the new program support and tools to help with submitting your project under LEEDv4. Enroll

Projects

360 Villa 360 Villa

123DV

Panda House Panda House

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

Buffalo Bayou Park Buffalo Bayou Park

Page, SWA Group

Prism Tower Prism Tower

Christian de Portzamparc

CitySpaces MicroPAD CitySpaces MicroPAD

Panoramic Interests

Burrawong House Burrawong House

Bijl Architecture

S:t Erik Indoor Park S:t Erik Indoor Park

Utopia Arkitekter

The Big Bend The Big Bend

Oiio Studio

Lincoln Park House Lincoln Park House

HBRA Architects

Bosjes Chapel Bosjes Chapel

Steyn Studio

One Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza One Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza

Studios Architecture

1 Hillside 1 Hillside

Tim Cuppett Architects

Concrete at Alserkal Avenue Concrete at Alserkal Avenue

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

Shaolin Flying Monks Temple Shaolin Flying Monks Temple

Mailitis Architects

New York at Its Core New York at Its Core

Studio Joseph

Oberholz Mountain Hut Oberholz Mountain Hut

Peter Pichler Architecture

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