Continuing Ed

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Architect is pleased to partner with Hanley Wood University, the leading CEU destination for Architects and Construction professionals.  Below please find a broad sampling of courses from Hanley Wood University.  Their continuing education directory offers hundreds of courses, created by leading specialists, for the following certification programs: AIA, AIA/HSW, ASLA, GBCI, IDCEC, NAHB, NARI, and NKBA. 
Enroll, take a course, and earn credit – all year long, any time of day or night.

Results

  • Course Credits
    AIA 1.0 LU
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    The World is Flat: A 21st Century Approach to Urban Hydrology

    This course looks at the evolution of stormwater management and how it has shaped site development decision-making. The course discusses the emerging concept of veneer hydrology, a shallow horizontal waterflow management system that uses evapotranspiration instead of infiltration. Veneer hydrology entails placing thin layers of soil and vegetation in areas of the urban environment that don’t lend themselves to landscaping such as over utilities, buried structures, and subways. Key design parameters are outlined to bridge challenging landscapes with unstable soils and limited depth settings. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Controlling Moisture Movement in Buildings

    Air and Air Vapor Barriers can play a significant role in building efficiency. This one-hour learning unit examines ways in which moisture enters a building. You will be able to explain how moisture management has affected buildings and be able to define and discuss what is meant by air leakage and vapor diffusion. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA 1.0 LU
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    A Primer On Rainscreen Wall Systems (Print Version)


    Rainscreen wall systems are used to protect buildings from water penetration and related moisture damage. They are especially effective when used with impermeable types of exterior cladding. In very wet regions of the U.S., rainscreen wall systems are sometimes required by code (i.e., regions with greater than 60 inches of rainfall per year). It is considered good practice to use rainscreen wall systems in moderately wet climates (i.e., 20–60 inches of rain fall per year). They are also very effective for improving the durability of the exterior walls of buildings – when porous building materials are used. Rainscreen wall systems can also offer an attractive light weight approach to constructing an exterior wall. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Moisture Mitigation with Rainscreen Technologies (Print Course)

    There is no such thing as a water-tight structure. Because water takes the path of least resistance, it will find even the smallest opening in the building envelope, allowing moisture to enter the wall system, no matter how many layers of protection are provided. Therefore, in addition to keeping water out with various weather resistive barriers (WRB), systems must be put in place to allow water to exit the envelope once it inevitably does get in. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Open Cell Spray Foam Insulation in Commercial Buildings

    Open Cell Spray Foam insulation is a logical and proven choice for commercial buildings as it can reduce upfront costs by taking advantage of higher yield and also can reduce energy related operating costs for buildings. In addition to having the lowest environmental impact by being water-blown, Open Cell Spray Foam Insulation also contributes to improved indoor air quality within the building and overall building occupant comfort. Over the course of this presentation, you will learn about Open Cell Insulation’s air barrier and vapor permeability, fire ratings and code compliance, ability to enhance a building's longevity, and environmental and Green Building contributions, as well as all health and safety directions, recommendations and best practices. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA 1.0 LU
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Continuous Insulation - Spray Polyurethane Foam vs. Rigid Foam Board

    The design of exterior wall assemblies has become increasingly focused on performance for greater energy efficiency and resistance to air and water penetration. The 2015 International Energy Conservation Code and ASHRAE 90.1 now requires insulation that is continuous in wall assemblies, (i.e. not interrupted by studs, framing, etc.) in all eight climate zones within the United States. This push for continuous insulation in exterior wall assemblies is also reflected in green building standards and the desires of building owners to reduce energy costs.

    In this presentation, we will look at the performance, installation and cost advantages of medium density spray foam insulation compared to the commonly used rigid foam board in continuous insulation applications.

    Enroll

Projects

Continuous Interior Continuous Interior

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

Dunn House Dunn House

The Practice of Everyday Design

Bibliothèque Alexis de Tocqueville Bibliothèque Alexis de Tocqueville

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

The Word The Word

FaulknerBrowns Architects

Red Ice Red Ice

NRJA

Northern Arizona University Science and Health Building Northern Arizona University Science and Health Building

Richärd+Bauer Architecture, GLHN Architects & Engineers

St. Ann's Warehouse St. Ann's Warehouse

Marvel Architects

Cleveland Civic Core Cleveland Civic Core

LMN Architects

Regeneracion Regeneracion

Sasaki Associates

Rock Chapel Marine Rock Chapel Marine

Landing Studio

Writers Theatre Writers Theatre

Studio Gang Architects

Claire T. Carney Library Claire T. Carney Library

designLAB Architects, Austin Architects

Pinterest Headquarters Pinterest Headquarters

IwamotoScott Architecture, Brereton Architects

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