Continuing Ed

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Architect is pleased to partner with Hanley Wood University, the leading CEU destination for Architects and Construction professionals.  Below please find a broad sampling of courses from Hanley Wood University.  Their continuing education directory offers hundreds of courses, created by leading specialists, for the following certification programs: AIA, AIA/HSW, ASLA, GBCI, IDCEC, NAHB, NARI, and NKBA. 
Enroll, take a course, and earn credit – all year long, any time of day or night.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Case Study: A Polyaspartic Coating Made a Commercial Bakery Floor Look Really Sweet (Print Course)

    This course discusses the benefits of polyaspartic floor coatings and how they were used for a flooring renovation at the SpringHouse bakery in Washington, PA. The requirements for the project were a long-lasting, durable flooring option that would hold up to common contaminants from the baking process, abrasion from foot and wheel traffic, staining from spilt materials, and provide resistance to the frequent cleaning process. Of course fast return-to-service time and aesthetics were important as well; a polyaspartic floor coating was able to meet all of these needs and more. Enroll
  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Rethinking Wood as a Material of Choice: Costs Less, Delivers More (Print Course)

    Designers today are finding new possibilities in one of the oldest building materials on earth. Wood has always been valued for its beauty, abundance and practicality, but many of wood’s inherent characteristics are rising to very current challenges. Wood’s traditional values and newest technologies meet in the projects presented in this course, illustrating the advantages of wood to in four areas: cost-effectiveness in a wide range of projects; adaptability for use in challenging, visionary new designs; lower environmental costs throughout its life cycle, from its source in renewable, carefully managed forests, through an energy-efficient service life, and often on to a new, recycled and reimagined use; and a unique human-nature connection that has always been intuitive, but is now being documented in research.

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  • Course Credits
    AIA/HSW 1.0 LU/HSW
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Green Building and Wood Products (Print Course)

    With growing pressure to reduce the carbon footprint of the built environment, building designers are increasingly being called upon to balance functionality and cost objectives with reduced environmental impact. Wood can help to achieve that balance. This continuing education course examines key green building rating programs and how wood building materials and components are rated within each. Increased reliance on LCA and environmental product declarations (EPDs), and the implications for wood construction, are also explored.

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  • Course Credits
    AIA 1.0 LU
    GBCI (CE) 1.0 CE Hour
    Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Evaluating the Carbon Footprint of Wood Buildings (Print Course)

    Worldwide, there has been increasing focus on the carbon footprint of buildings and recognition that design professionals are uniquely positioned to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere by creating high-performance structures. This course examines the environmental impacts of wood products—from the global scale of the world’s forests to the individual scale of efficient, adaptable, and innovative buildings—using real-world examples from two U.S. carbon calculators as well as the latest research on LCA.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    The Impact of Wood Use on North American Forests (Print Course)

    As green building has evolved beyond its initial emphasis on energy efficiency, greater attention has been given to the choice of structural materials and the degree to which they influence a building’s environmental footprint. Increasingly, wood from sustainably managed forests is viewed as a responsible choice—for a number of reasons. Wood grows naturally by harnessing energy from the sun, absorbing carbon dioxide and releasing oxygen. It is renewable and a carbon sink, and outperforms other materials in terms of embodied energy, air and water pollution, and other impact indicators.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Mid-Rise Wood Construction: A Cost-Effective and Sustainable Choice For Achieving High-Performance Goals (Print Course)

    Cost-effective, code-compliant and sustainable, mid-rise wood construction is gaining the attention of design professionals nationwide, who see it as a way to achieve higher density housing at lower cost—while reducing the carbon footprint of their projects. Yet, many familiar with wood construction for two- to four-story residential structures are not aware that the International Building Code (IBC) allows wood-frame construction for five stories and more in building occupancies that range from business and mercantile to multi-family, military, senior, student and affordable housing.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Modern Building Codes: Keeping Pace With The Wood Revolution (Print Course)

    There is a quiet revolution taking place within the design community. After a long emphasis on concrete and steel for buildings other than homes, design professionals are using wood to great effect in a growing number of non-residential and multi-family building types—in applications that range from traditional to innovative, even iconic. Some are driven by wood’s cost effectiveness, while others cite its versatility or low carbon footprint, but their collective path has been made possible by building codes that increasingly recognize wood’s structural and performance capabilities, and the continued evolution of wood building systems and techniques.

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  • Average Rating
    4.5 of 5 stars

    Wood and Indoor Environment - Creating Beneficial Spaces for Living, Working, Well-Being (Print Course)

    The objectives of sustainable design are broader than just environmental effects, having come to embrace issues of human health and performance. Many factors influence whether a building has a positive or negative impact on its occupants. This course highlights remarkable buildings where the use of wood as a structural or finish material has made a unique contribution, with a focus on indoor air quality, acoustics, physical health, and a natural, positive human response to wood that has always been intuitive, but is increasingly being proven by research and experience.

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  • Average Rating
    5.0 of 5 stars

    Aluminum Clad Windows and Traditional Wood Frame Windows

    This course will provide the architect with an overview of different window materials and options available today, as well as an explanation of some of the main criteria used to evaluate windows. Enroll
  • Average Rating
    4.0 of 5 stars

    Winning Projects with White Cement

    This course will introduce the learner to the many advantages of concrete including sustainability, durability, aesthetics, versatility, resilience, and affordability. The expanded benefits of white concrete such as reflectivity, colors, and textures will also be discussed along with examples of specific applications. Enroll

Projects

Rock & Branch Rock & Branch

Hyunjoon Yoo Architects

Continuous Interior Continuous Interior

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA)

Dunn House Dunn House

The Practice of Everyday Design

Bibliothèque Alexis de Tocqueville Bibliothèque Alexis de Tocqueville

Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Barcode Architects

The Word The Word

FaulknerBrowns Architects

Red Ice Red Ice

NRJA

Northern Arizona University Science and Health Building Northern Arizona University Science and Health Building

Richärd+Bauer Architecture, GLHN Architects & Engineers

St. Ann's Warehouse St. Ann's Warehouse

Marvel Architects

Cleveland Civic Core Cleveland Civic Core

LMN Architects

Regeneracion Regeneracion

Sasaki Associates

Rock Chapel Marine Rock Chapel Marine

Landing Studio

Writers Theatre Writers Theatre

Studio Gang Architects

Claire T. Carney Library Claire T. Carney Library

designLAB Architects, Austin Architects

Pinterest Headquarters Pinterest Headquarters

IwamotoScott Architecture, Brereton Architects

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