Unemployment Explained: A recent New York Federal Reserve Bank report shows that the unemployment rate for recent college graduates who majored in architecture and construction ties with liberal arts majors at 8 percent, the highest rate among the majors in the report. Quartz reporter Roberto Ferdman warns if students want a job after college, “don’t major in architecture.”

Credit: Courtesy U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, U.S. Department of Labor, O*Net

But here’s another wrinkle from that report: 32 percent of recent grads who majored in architecture and construction are employed in jobs that don’t require a bachelor’s degree. That leaves 60 percent of these grads employed in jobs that do—higher than the sciences, social sciences, business, liberal arts, communications, technologies, agriculture and natural resources, and leisure and hospitality. So while unemployment is relatively high among those majors, those that have a job are more likely to have needed to go to school to get it. [Quartz]

A Pattern Emerges: This is a carbon-footprint map showing New York City zip codes generated using the CoolClimate Calculator, a product of the University of California, Berkeley. Do you see what I see? [via @miller_stephen]


More News:

Let's just start with the headline: "3D Printing a Star Cluster: How the Blind Can Feel Hubble Space Pictures"—how can you not click? [Popular Mechanics]

A photographer in Greece shot the insides of everyday buildings, and she told The New Yorker: “Spaces, which once seemed banal or unimportant, now reveal nuances of Greek reality and have social and political implications,” she said. [The New Yorker]

Former Public School 31, 425 Grand Concourse, at East 144th Street, nicknamed "the Castle on the Concourse"

Former Public School 31, 425 Grand Concourse, at East 144th Street, nicknamed "the Castle on the Concourse"


The Landmarks Preservation Commission has condemned New York City for “disgraceful stewardship”—as one member called it—of the “Castle on the Concourse,” an abandoned public school building in the South Bronx. The 1899 building, which became a landmark in 1986, is so deteriorated that the demolition may be its only option. [The New York Times]

The role for architects and designers has changed and has forced them to consider that their decisions cause a ripple effect through global supply chains: “The architect who specifies a particular type of aluminum-framed window for a skyscraper is making a decision not only about cost, appearance, usability, strength and safety, but also about an entire supply chain that provides those windows.”  [The Guardian]

The Portland Building built in 1982 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2011

The Portland Building built in 1982 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2011

Credit: Courtesy camknows/Flickr


Portland, Ore. is trying to decide what to do with the Michael Graves–designed Portland Building. The famed Postmodern tower has always garnered criticism for a sloppy build-out. Now, though, there's a $95 million price-tag attached to addressing those problems, and Portland's City Council is beginning to grumble. [The Oregonian]

These rugs look like sushi, or as one commenter notes “technicolor CT scan slices of diseased abdomens.” [The New York Times Style Magazine]

The Museum of London is starting over in its plans to rethink its 1976 Powell & Moya–designed home. [Architects' Journal]

A Manhattan judge put a hold on New York University’s plan for expansion, ruling that the project cannot proceed without state approval. Critics argue that expansion would impose on the historic neighborhood. [Huffington Post]

Here's a first look at the Museum of the Arts and Crafts Movement in St. Petersburg, Fla., designed by Alberto Alfonso. [Tampa Bay Business Journal]

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