2010 R+D Awards

 

2010 R+D Awards

  • Fourth Annual R+D Awards

    This year's jury selected 11 winners—ranging from sustainable housing to steam-bending and rubber sinks—based on a combination of performance, aesthetics, and progressive thinking.

     
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    Award: Digital Steam-Bending

    A University of Michigan research group has revisited the 19th century technique of bending wood through steam with 21st century tools.

     
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    Award: R-House

    Designed by two New York architecture firms, the compact R-House offers a prototype for low-energy housing that’s also affordable and adaptable.

     
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    Award: RUBBiSH (Recycled Rubber Sinks)

    In the world of green, worth is usually measured in acronyms—VOCs, IAQ, FSC, etc. Minarc's rubber sink, however, has a pedigree so pure, no acronyms are necessary.

     
  • The team compiled a database of information that helped determine carbon emissions for buildings in the Chicago Loop. These emissions can now be visualized on a color spectrum from red (very high emissions) to dark green (low emissions).

    Award: Chicago Central Area Decarbonization Plan

    Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture, known for net-zero and positive-energy designs, is helping its hometown of Chicago meet carbon-reduction goals.

     
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    Award: North House: Responsive Envelope Prototyping

    Designed for the 2009 Solar Decathlon, RVTR/Team North's 800-square-foot prototype house is tailor-made for northern climates.

     
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    Award: Green-Zip Tape

    It’s hard to get simpler in conception and execution than Green-Zip Tape, a substitute for the joint-compound tape that's been used between gypsum board panels since the 1930s.

     
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    Award: Shadow Pavilion

    The surface of PLY Architecture's Shadow Pavilion consists of 100-plus laser-cut cones that test the limits of sheet aluminum while funneling in light, moisture, and sound.

     
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    Citation: Community Rowing Boathouse

    When the only public-access rowing club on the Charles River required a new facility, Anmahian Winton Architects saw a chance to update the vocabulary of local rowing structures.

     
  • To help visualize the three-dimensional quality of the surface, the team went through a prototyping process that involved popping bubble wrap over a pattern of planned raised, flat, and depressed dots.

    Citation: Bitmaps

    Wallpaper isn't everyone's cup of tea. In response to a client’s interest in 3D wall paneling, PROJECTiONE set out to invent a system of ornamental tiles.