Princeton geology professor Kenneth Deffeyes and his son, illustrator Stephen Deffeyes, have combined their respective talents in the book Nanoscale: Visualizing an Invisible World. In it, they reveal the atomic architecture of things most people take for granted, like air, and some most people dont even know about, like perovskite (left), a mineral found at the center of the Earth. The younger Deffeyes presents the structures in 3D illustrations that occasionally verge on the psychedelic. Brief essays  surprisingly engaging for quantum mechanics  explain each substances significance, which is sometimes as simple as pure beauty of form. $21.95; MIT Press

BOOK
Princeton geology professor Kenneth Deffeyes and his son, illustrator Stephen Deffeyes, have combined their respective talents in the book Nanoscale: Visualizing an Invisible World. In it, they reveal the atomic architecture of things most people take for granted, like air, and some most people don’t even know about, like perovskite, a mineral found at the center of the Earth. The younger Deffeyes presents the structures in 3D illustrations that occasionally verge on the psychedelic. Brief essays—surprisingly engaging for quantum mechanics—explain each substance’s significance, which is sometimes as simple as pure beauty of form.
$21.95; MIT Press
Hannah McCann

Credit: Mike Morgan