Hanley Wood University

 

AIA

  • Cool Roofs in Perspective: Do Reflective Roofs Really Reduce Global Warming?

    1 LU AIA/HSW

    This course is registered with AIA for 1 HSW hour. “Cool” roofs have become the fastest growing single segment of the commercial roofing industry, primarily as a way to save energy and address climate change. This course will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various roof types in different climates and the potential problems that may arise when “cool” roofs are installed in the wrong location. You will discover tools to run the numbers on each specific site and building before choosing the right roof for your project. Finally, it will analyze current studies that provide a fresh perspective on “cool” roofs and help you answer the question: “Do reflective roofs really reduce global warming?" Take the course.

    Posted:
    April 2012
    Subject(s):
    Roofing
    Sponsor:
    Carlisle SynTec
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Vinyl Siding for Exteriors

    1 LU AIA

    This course is registered with AIA for 1 CEH. Vinyl siding products are the preferred exterior cladding material, in both new construction and remodeling projects because they have numerous advantages over other siding materials. Design preferences have increased the number of profiles and color choices. The sustainability of vinyl has proven significant, with products that include recycled content and environmentally friendly manufacturing procedures. Combine that with remarkable technical advances, and you have a product that looks great, is low-maintenance, and holds up to the elements. The extensive range of products, from wider profiles to vinyl siding with insulation to polypropylene-based injected molded shingles, has taken vinyl from a product associated with starter homes to the luxury home market. Take the course.

    Posted:
    March 2012
    Subject(s):
    Building Envelope, Siding, Exteriors
    Sponsor:
    Mastic
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • How We See Color Course

    1 LU AIA

    This course will describe how the human eye detects and identifies color and adapts to its surroundings and why this is important to consider with lighting design. This course will take a closer look at the complexity of the color process, while also defining and explaining key elements, such as: color consistency, stability, metamerism, color rendering, and the color rendering index. This course is registered for 1 AIA CEH. Take the course.

    Posted:
    March 2012
    Subject(s):
    Lighting
    Sponsor:
    Tivoli
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Cementitious Materials in Concrete: Performance and Sustainability in Construction

    1 LU AIA/SD

    This describes where concrete has been used in a variety of projects that support sustainable construction. It outlines the manufacturing process and source of cement and other cementitious materials used in the production of concrete. It also outlines some of the physical properties of these materials, how they may be used in concrete to enhance durability, and how advances in mixture design and manufacturing technology enhance concrete’s contribution to sustainable construction. Take the course.

    Posted:
    January 2012
    Subject(s):
    Cementitious Materials and Pozzolans, Sustainability
    Sponsor:
    Holcim
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Benefits of VRF in the LEED® Certification Process

    1 LU HSW/SD

    This article is available in the October 2011 print and digital editions of ARCHTIECT Magazine. It is registered for 1 HSW/SD hour with AIA and 1 CMP hour with GBCI. This program compares traditional HVAC systems to variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems. General features and benefits of VRF systems are discussed, including energy efficiency, installation, operation and potential contribution to LEED rating systems. Architects, building owners, contractors, operation and maintenance management will be introduced to VRF systems. Three case examples are presented, describing why VRF was selected for each of the projects and what the estimated benefits of the VRF system were in each case. Finally, a brief overview of VRF systems in building information modeling (BIM) is presented. Take the course.

    Posted:
    October 2011
    Subject(s):
    HVAC
    Sponsor:
    Mitsubishi Electric Cooling and Heating
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Baths for Today and Tomorrow: An Overview of 2010 ADA Standards

    1 LU AIA/HSW

    Thank you for your interest in the codes and standards that govern accessibility requirements. This course explores the demographics that are driving the accessible bath fixture market. All manufacturers must comply with the same requirements in order to meet UFAS and ADA standards. The accessibility standards common to all manufacturers challenge them to evacuate water on a shower floor that has a ¼-inch pitch to the drain. This is made more difficult by the fact that accessible showers have dams with minimal heights. The evolution of accessibility standards, the federal guidelines, and the products that meet these standards will be reviewed. At the end of this course you will be able to list codes and standards that govern accessibility requirements, identify project types that require accessible bath fixtures, and specify bath fixtures and accessories that meet current accessibility guidelines. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Subject(s):
    Codes and Standards, Universal Design, Design
    Sponsor:
    Aquatic
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Specifying Locks to meet 2010 ADA Standards for Schools

    1 LU HSW

    The “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design” issued by the Department of Justice (DOJ) contain new provisions that directly impact design specifications and construction on school projects completed after March 15, 2012. Failure to comply with newly mandated minimums could generate problems not only for schools and school districts, but also raise liability issues regarding architect responsibility. This course covers critical changes in ADA guidelines, focusing on key aspects relating to schools, ADA students, locks and lockers. We’ll compare functionality, ease of use and features of ADA-compliant locks and non-compliant locks. We’ll look at value-added design advantages, cost issues and long-term operational flexibility factors for you to consider when you are specifying locker locks for your next project. Finally, we’ll detail new product options available to better serve students whose abilities fall within the ADA Standards. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Subject(s):
    Codes and Standards, Locksets and Hardware
    Sponsor:
    Master Lock
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Concrete Basics: Curing and Sealing

    1 LU LU

    There are many factors that affect the long term durability of concrete. Some of these are: mix design, environmental conditions, structural loading and design, quality of the raw materials used in the concrete and mixing, placing and curing. This presentation will explain the basics of cement hydration, and introduce the various curing methods and floor treatments available. In addition, this presentation will help the specifying agency and/or end user identify the proper materials and products needed for the project. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Subject(s):
    Concrete Surfaces, Concrete Curing
    Sponsor:
    W.R. Meadows
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Repair & Refurbish: High Performance Coatings for Concrete

    1 LU

    This program introduces different classes of high performance concrete coatings and compares and contrasts typical surface preparation requirements for different types of coatings. The course describes the basic chemistry and performance properties of different high performance coatings. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Sponsor:
    Bayer Materials Science
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Segmental Retaining Walls for Project Site Stability

    1 LU

    Many people do not realize the complexity and strategic planning that goes into maintaining the integrity of a job site. Job sites are as unique as the building or structure that will be built on them - the topography, drainage, soil type, indigenous flora and proximity to waterways are all taken into consideration in site planning. Using segmental retaining walls on a job site can prevent erosion, add to a project’s aesthetic appeal, or create more useable land. This presentation will look at how segmental retaining walls maintain and improve a job site. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2011
    Sponsor:
    Keystone Retaining Wall Systems
    Certification(s):
    AIA, ASLA