Hanley Wood University

 

HVAC

  • HVLS Fans Come of Age

    1 LU HSW

    Headquartered in San Bernardino, CA, MacroAir is the pioneer of the HVLS (High-Volume, Low-Speed) fan industry. As engineers of air™ we are dedicated to continually innovating and perfecting the world’s most efficient fans for businesses. MacroAir products are made in the USA, but can be found around the world creating comfortable climates in a more cost-effective and energy-efficient way than traditional fans and HVAC systems. Take the course.

    Posted:
    July 2013
    Subject(s):
    HVAC
    Sponsor:
    MacroAir
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Impact of Combined Heat and Power Systems in Residential and Commercial Buildings Course

    1 LU HSW/SD/AIA

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, as the name implies, serve dual purposes. First, they use a propane or natural gas generator to create electricity. The electricity produced from the generator is used by the home, reducing energy costs. If more electricity is generated than is consumed, the power can be sold back to the grid through net metering available in most states. Simultaneously, the heat from the engine is captured and used to warm the building or create hot water, further reducing energy costs. CHP units have been used in Europe for years and are now becoming more popular in the U.S. This courses is registered for the following education credits: 1 HSW/SD hour, AIA; 1 NAHB hour, 1 NARI hour. Take the course.

    Posted:
    March 2012
    Subject(s):
    Building Performance, HVAC, Energy Efficiency
    Sponsor:
    Propane Education and Research Council
    Certification(s):
    NAHB, NARI
  • Benefits of VRF in the LEED® Certification Process

    1 LU HSW/SD

    This article is available in the October 2011 print and digital editions of ARCHTIECT Magazine. It is registered for 1 HSW/SD hour with AIA and 1 CMP hour with GBCI. This program compares traditional HVAC systems to variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems. General features and benefits of VRF systems are discussed, including energy efficiency, installation, operation and potential contribution to LEED rating systems. Architects, building owners, contractors, operation and maintenance management will be introduced to VRF systems. Three case examples are presented, describing why VRF was selected for each of the projects and what the estimated benefits of the VRF system were in each case. Finally, a brief overview of VRF systems in building information modeling (BIM) is presented. Take the course.

    Posted:
    October 2011
    Subject(s):
    HVAC
    Sponsor:
    Mitsubishi Electric Cooling and Heating
    Certification(s):
    AIA
  • Comfort by Design: Introduction to HVAC’s Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Technology

    By the end of this course you will be able to identify the fundamentals of heating, ventilations and air conditioning systems (HVAC). You will also be able to identify the fundamentals of new VRF technology. You will evaluate the energy efficiency and environmental impact of VRF technology. And finally, you will be able to identify the many building design options available with VRF technology. Take the course.

    Posted:
    August 2011
    Subject(s):
    HVAC
    Sponsor:
    Mitsubishi Electric
  • A Comparative Analysis of Residential Heating Systems

    1 LU HSW/SD

    You will be able to describe general trends when comparing heating systems in terms of first costs, operating costs, carbon emissions and paybacks. You will be able to describe how carbon emissions differ among different heating systems and why that can vary depending on location. You will be able to compare and contrast trade offs involved in specifying high efficiency HVAC equipment for residential projects in terms of payback periods. Take the course.

    Posted:
    September 2009
    Subject(s):
    Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, HVAC, Life-Cycle Assessment, Green Design, Technology
    Sponsor:
    Propane Education and Research Council
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NARI, NAHB, USGBC
  • Propane-Enhanced Renewable Energy Systems

    1.0 LU HSW/SD

    You will be able to explain why supplemental energy is often required to support renewable energy technologies. You will be able to describe how propane supplements three types of alternative energy technologies. You will be able to identify several limiting factors that will help you specify an appropriate renewable energy system. Finally, you will be able to identify basic functions of common features in three renewable energy technologies. Take the course.

    Posted:
    August 2009
    Subject(s):
    Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Technology, HVAC
    Sponsor:
    Propane Education and Research Council
    Certification(s):
    AIA, NAHB, NARI