Exhibits Books Etc

 

Exhibits Books Etc.

  • Exhibit: 'Field Conditions'

    Architects describe space without buildings, and artists describe space with architectural language in a new exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art that revists Stan Allen's deconstructivist essay from 1996.

     
  • Book: 'Furniture Studio'

    A survey of the University of Washington's furniture studio by Jeffrey Ochsner reveals the linkage between materials and making that defines the field of architecture.

     
  • Exhibit: ‘Urban Fabric: Building New York’s Garment District’

    Architects in the '20s designed the largest concentration of skyscrapers in the world, to house most of the U.S. clothing-manufacturing business. An exhibit at New York's Skyscraper Museum explores the transformation from then to today's high-end fashion headquarters.

     
  • Exhibit: 'Now Boarding'

    In the post-9/11 era, there is great potential for airports to be soul-sucking, stressful places. Working hard to make the utilitarian pleasant is Denver's Fentress Architects, which has six of its airports now on exhibit at the Denver Art Museum.

     
  • Exhibit: 'Considering the Quake: Seismic Design on the Edge'

    An upcoming exhibit in Toronto highlights what kind of design emerges when buildings are designed for seismic conditions, as well as for aesthetic quality.

     
  • Tongue-in-Cheek Drawings of Olympic Venues

    The Olympics are over, but you can’t stop dreaming about the architecture, you say? No worries. Clo’e Floirat drew “comical-satirical” versions of the 2012 venues for posterity's sake.

     
  • Book: ‘Bridges: The Science and Art of the World’s Most Inspiring Structures’

    Author David Blockley dissects bridges as something beyond common infrastructure—more like an architectural suspension of science, art, and craft.

     
  • Book: 'Design for a Vulnerable Planet'

    The future of design must address nature and her vulnerabilities, says Frederick Steiner in 'Design for a Vulnerable Planet,' especially as a larger human population necessarily means more destruction from natural and unnatural disasters.

     
  • Image

    Exhibit: 'Kevin Roche: Architecture as Environment'

    The National Building Museum in Washington, D.C., is holding a retrospective of the 1982 Pritzker Prize–winning architect, Kevin Roche. Through Dec. 2.

     
  • Book: 'Citizens of No Place'

    Jimenez Lai’s use of the cartoon as a vehicle for theory helps tone down (and poke fun at) contemporary architectural rhetoric.

     
 
 
 

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