Archizoom Associati's groovy Superonda Sofa (1966) is still in production.
Archizoom Associati's groovy Superonda Sofa (1966) is still in production.

We are children of the revolution—the counterculture revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. “It’s difficult to identify another period of history that has exerted more influence on contemporary culture and politics,” says Andrew Blauvelt, the Walker Art Center's outgoing senior curator of research, design and publishing, and organizer of the exhibition Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia. On view in Minneapolis from October 24, 2015 through February 28, 2016, Hippie Modernism organizes art, architecture, and design projects of the era according to three categories, based upon Timothy Leary’s famous dictum, “Turn on, tune in, drop out.” Blauvelt defines the era as spanning from 1964 (when Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters made their legendary cross-country road/acid trip) to 1974 (when the OPEC energy crisis erupted). But of course, in the words of the immortal Sonny & Cher, “the beat goes on.”

With the Environment Transformer/Flyhead Helmet (1968), Austrian group Haus-Rucker-Co intended to distort wearers' perceptions.
With the Environment Transformer/Flyhead Helmet (1968), Austrian group Haus-Rucker-Co intended to distort wearers' perceptions.
San Francisco performance troupe The Cockettes (in a 1972 photograph by Clay Geerdes) specialized in psychedelic renditions of classic show tunes.
San Francisco performance troupe The Cockettes (in a 1972 photograph by Clay Geerdes) specialized in psychedelic renditions of classic show tunes.
Feminist graphic designer Sheila Levrant de Bretteville's poster for the Women in Design: The Next Decade conference (1975) in Los Angeles.
Feminist graphic designer Sheila Levrant de Bretteville's poster for the Women in Design: The Next Decade conference (1975) in Los Angeles.
Ken Isaacs' Superchair (1967) was the first subject in a series of build-it-yourself articles the designer published in Popular Science magazine from 1968 to 1972.
Ken Isaacs' Superchair (1967) was the first subject in a series of build-it-yourself articles the designer published in Popular Science magazine from 1968 to 1972.