Dormitory furnishings from 1959 installed in Paris' Maison du Brésil, designed by Charlotte Perriand.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Dormitory furnishings from 1959 installed in Paris' Maison du Brésil, designed by Charlotte Perriand.

Interiors are heavily mulled over by designers for how they will affect their inhabitants—and rightfully so. But what about the external influences that helped to shape the design, whether they are social, technological, or political? A new exhibition curated by the Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) Architect and Design Department will explore that topic for a range of environments developed at the height of the modern movement, from the 1920s through the 1950s.

On view from Oct. 1 of this year to April 23, 2017, “How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior” will feature an array of rooms, some of which will include domestic interiors, exhibition displays, and retail spaces. MoMA curator Juliet Kinchin’s aim is to highlight how that time frame’s trends are shown in material and spatial forms, and will include recent acquisitions by major women architect-designers which include their own living spaces, along with commonly overlooked areas such as textile furnishings, wallpapers, kitchens, temporary exhibitions, and promotional displays. The entire show includes over 300 pieces, and incorporate large-scale interiors such as Grete Lihotzky's Frankfurt Kitchen, Lilly Reich and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's Velvet and Silk Café, and Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier's kitchen from the Unité d'Habitation and study bedroom from the Maison du Brésil.

Design partnerships, both in a personal and design sense, highlighted throughout the show include Lilly Reich and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe; Grete Lihotzky and Ernst May; Eileen Gray and Jean Badovici; Aino and Alvar Aalto; Charles and Ray Eames; Florence Knoll and Herbert Matter; and Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier.

Another view of the dormitory furnishings from the Maison du Brésil by Charlotte Perriand, which are made out of wood, tubular steel, plastic, formica, fabric, and aluminum.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Another view of the dormitory furnishings from the Maison du Brésil by Charlotte Perriand, which are made out of wood, tubular steel, plastic, formica, fabric, and aluminum.
Frankfurt Kitchen from the Ginnheim-Höhenblick Housing Estate, in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, designed by Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky between 1926 and 1927.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Frankfurt Kitchen from the Ginnheim-Höhenblick Housing Estate, in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, designed by Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky between 1926 and 1927.
Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier's kitchen from the Unité d’Habitation, in Marseille, France, designed in 1952.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Charlotte Perriand and Le Corbusier's kitchen from the Unité d’Habitation, in Marseille, France, designed in 1952.
A fabric sample by Swedish architect Sven Markelius designed between 1948 and 1950.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York A fabric sample by Swedish architect Sven Markelius designed between 1948 and 1950.

Chair for the Villa Tempe a Pailla designed by Gray, Eileen, circa 1935. The modernist chairs are made out of nickel-plated tubular steel and leather.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Chair for the Villa Tempe a Pailla designed by Gray, Eileen, circa 1935. The modernist chairs are made out of nickel-plated tubular steel and leather.

Extendable Table by Eileen Gray, from her midecentury home "E-1027" in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin along France's Côte d’Azur. Read more about the restoration of Gray's residence in the South of France here.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Extendable Table by Eileen Gray, from her midecentury home "E-1027" in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin along France's Côte d’Azur. Read more about the restoration of Gray's residence in the South of France here.
View of the 1927 Velvet and Silk Café in Berlin by Lilly Reich.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York View of the 1927 Velvet and Silk Café in Berlin by Lilly Reich.