The Barcelona architect and designer behind the 8-bit architect portraits and movie architecture illustrations has now imagined a city of 26 letter-shaped buildings, each representing an architect. Federico Babina completed his "ARCHIBET" series in January.

"Each letter is a small surrealist architecture that becomes part of an imaginary city made up of different shapes and styles that speak the same language of architecture," he says in an email. The design of the imaginary buildings pull from the architect's repertoire (The Guggenheim, for instance, can be spotted on the W illustration.)

I asked Babina why he keeps coming back to these types of illustrations: "I'm fascinated by the idea of being able to blend the world of architecture and illustration," he says in the email. "Transform the architecture in an illustration and illustrations in an architecture."

The complete series can be seen on his website.

  • U is for Jørn Utzon. See the Sydney Opera House?

    Credit: Federico Babina

    U is for Jørn Utzon. See the Sydney Opera House?
  • Spot New York's Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

    Credit: Federico Babina

    Spot New York's Guggenheim Museum, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

  • The illustration for Herzog  de Meuron features their Bird's Nest in Beijing.

    Credit: Federico Babina

    The illustration for Herzog & de Meuron features their Bird's Nest in Beijing.
  • Jean Nouvel's Torre Agbar in Barcelona forms the stem of the J.

    Credit: Federico Babina

    Jean Nouvel's Torre Agbar in Barcelona forms the stem of the "J."

  • The iconic colorblocking of the Eames House, designed by the eponymous architect, appears in the E building.

    Credit: Federico Babina

    The iconic colorblocking of the Eames House, designed by the eponymous architect, appears in the "E" building.
  • The illustration for N features Oscar Niemeyer's eye-shaped museum in Curitiba, Brazil.

    Credit: Federico Babina

    The illustration for "N" features Oscar Niemeyer's eye-shaped museum in Curitiba, Brazil.

Credit: Federico Babina