Photo of the Day:

Eurostar launched its new e320 train at London's St Pancras International Station yesterday morning. Built by German firm Siemens and capable of carrying 900 passengers, the e320 train will go into service at the end of 2015. In a £550 million (roughly $861 million) deal, Eurostar originally ordered 10 of the e320s—named for their speed of travel at 320kph (200mph)—but at the launch, the company announced that another seven trains will be joining the fleet next year.
Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire Eurostar launched its new e320 train at London's St Pancras International Station yesterday morning. Built by German firm Siemens and capable of carrying 900 passengers, the e320 train will go into service at the end of 2015. In a £550 million (roughly $861 million) deal, Eurostar originally ordered 10 of the e320s—named for their speed of travel at 320kph (200mph)—but at the launch, the company announced that another seven trains will be joining the fleet next year.

Check out ARCHITECT editor-in-chief Ned Cramer's discussion of the gradual growth of U.S. high-speed rail, featured in our November issue.

ICYMI: The Smithsonian Institute revealed Bjarke Ingels Group's plans for its south campus, the Museum of Modern Art announced the finalists invited to submit proposals in its 2015 Young Architects Program, and Harvard's art museums are slated to open on Sunday.

Quote of the Day: "I have kind of a crazy hypothesis. I think that every architect on the planet had part of their education dedicated to Chicago. In fact, Chicago is the canon of Modernism, so whether it’s Sullivan, Wright, Mies, or Burnham, there’s a part of your education as an architect that is already dedicated to the city." —Sarah Herda, one of the curators of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. [Chicago]

Maps of the Day: Damien Hirst’s “Black Scalpel Cityscapes” exhibit, consisting of aerial maps made using surgical tools, opened in São Paulo. [Designboom]

Instagram of the Day:

Folds and foliage #dmv #architecture

A photo posted by @deane_madsen on


Six More Stories for Friday:

Chicago designated the Riverfront a special "sign district," which places guidelines on riverfront signs going forward. It has no impact on the 20-foot tall letters Donald Trump installed on his own tower (which prompted the rule change)—meaning Trump's sign will have no competition. [Chicago Sun-Times]

CityLab writer (and former ARCHITECT senior editor) Kriston Capps analyzes the next batch of New York skyscrapers. [CityLab]

"Don't Break the Exacto Knife," a project at Tulane University's architecture school highlighting 120 portraits of current students, opens on Monday. [Tulane University]

What is stalling the U.K.'s progress in the reduction of energy consumption in commercial buildings? [The Guardian]

Architectural engineers are looking for new materials to build energy-efficient buildings. [NPR]

A century-old Coca-Cola factory in Los Angeles is being turned into an office and retail space. [Los Angeles Times]

Step Up, Step Down:

Nan Ellin was named founding dean of a new University of Texas at Arlington college combining the School of Architecture with the School of Urban and Public Affairs. [University of Texas at Arlington]

ARCHITECT Awards: Enter Now!

The Progressive Architecture (P/A) Awards recognize unbuilt projects demonstrating overall design excellence and innovation. The standard entry deadline is today. The submission deadline for late entries is Wed., Nov. 19.

For more news and views, sign up for the ARCHITECT Newswire, the best daily newsletter on architecture and architects.