Launch Slideshow

With the new gatehouse, the architects and their client realized a longstanding shared ambition: to use Trumpf's own technology to construct a building entirely of laser-cut and welded sheet metal. Above the gatehouse's functional core, which is enclosed in a glass pavilion, a honeycombed stainless steel roof cantilevers more than 60 feet.

Trumpf Campus Gatehouse

Barkow Leibinger Architects use 2D and 3D cutting and casting technology to create a huge cantilevered roof for the Gatehouse building on Trumpf's campus.

Trumpf Campus Gatehouse

Barkow Leibinger Architects use 2D and 3D cutting and casting technology to create a huge cantilevered roof for the Gatehouse building on Trumpf's campus.

  • Laser-cutting, welding, bolting, and pre-cambering produced a mass customized steel roof that is 50 cm (nearly 20 inches) deep.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmp10A8%2Etmp_tcm20-193383.jpg

    Laser-cutting, welding, bolting, and pre-cambering produced a mass customized steel roof that is 50 cm (nearly 20 inches) deep.

    600

    Courtesy Barkow Leibinger

    Laser-cutting, welding, bolting, and pre-cambering produced a mass customized steel roof that is 50 cm (nearly 20 inches) deep.

  • The gatehouse is the first building in a new master plan for the Trumpf campus. The glass pavilion around the core is composed of two layers of float glass that sandwich stacked tube sections of acrylic glass. This renders the core visible as a blurred, soft shape on the faÁade.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmp10A9%2Etmp_tcm20-193390.jpg

    The gatehouse is the first building in a new master plan for the Trumpf campus. The glass pavilion around the core is composed of two layers of float glass that sandwich stacked tube sections of acrylic glass. This renders the core visible as a blurred, soft shape on the faÁade.

    600

    David Franck

    The gatehouse is the first building in a new master plan for the Trumpf campus. The glass pavilion around the core is composed of two layers of float glass that sandwich stacked tube sections of acrylic glass. This renders the core visible as a blurred, soft shape on the facade.

  • The roof arrived on site in prefab strips, which were bolted together. Then the whole thing was hoisted onto the column pins. When the crane belts were removed, the roof bounced a meter (more than 3 feet) before rocking into place.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmp10AA%2Etmp_tcm20-193397.jpg

    The roof arrived on site in prefab strips, which were bolted together. Then the whole thing was hoisted onto the column pins. When the crane belts were removed, the roof bounced a meter (more than 3 feet) before rocking into place.

    600

    Barkow Leibinger

    The roof arrived on site in prefab strips, which were bolted together. Then the whole thing was hoisted onto the column pins. When the crane belts were removed, the roof bounced a meter (more than 3 feet) before rocking into place.

  • To see the logic of the structural loading, the architects built a series of 1:50 scale roof models based on different geometric patterns. After they made their choice--based on performance and aesthetics--they had the tricky job of scaling it up. The roof varies in density and material thickness in order to meet the changing static requirements: It's compact over the columns, light at the extent of the cantilever.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmp10AB%2Etmp_tcm20-193404.jpg

    To see the logic of the structural loading, the architects built a series of 1:50 scale roof models based on different geometric patterns. After they made their choice--based on performance and aesthetics--they had the tricky job of scaling it up. The roof varies in density and material thickness in order to meet the changing static requirements: It's compact over the columns, light at the extent of the cantilever.

    600

    Courtesy Barkow Leibinger

    To see the logic of the structural loading, the architects built a series of 1:50 scale roof models based on different geometric patterns. After they made their choice--based on performance and aesthetics--they had the tricky job of scaling it up. The roof varies in density and material thickness in order to meet the changing static requirements: It's compact over the columns, light at the extent of the cantilever.

  • With the new gatehouse, the architects and their client realized a longstanding shared ambition: to use Trumpf's own technology to construct a building entirely of laser-cut and welded sheet metal. Above the gatehouse's functional core, which is enclosed in a glass pavilion, a honeycombed stainless steel roof cantilevers more than 60 feet.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmp10AC%2Etmp_tcm20-193411.jpg

    With the new gatehouse, the architects and their client realized a longstanding shared ambition: to use Trumpf's own technology to construct a building entirely of laser-cut and welded sheet metal. Above the gatehouse's functional core, which is enclosed in a glass pavilion, a honeycombed stainless steel roof cantilevers more than 60 feet.

    600

    Zooey Braun

    With the new gatehouse, the architects and their client realized a longstanding shared ambition: to use Trumpf's own technology to construct a building entirely of laser-cut and welded sheet metal. Above the gatehouse's functional core, which is enclosed in a glass pavilion, a honeycombed stainless steel roof cantilevers more than 60 feet.

The 2D and 3D cutting and casting experiments that Barkow Leibinger Architects has undertaken arose from Frank Barkow and Regine Leibinger’s interest in emerging technologies and their firm conviction that, as they say, “Tools shape materials that make forms, not the other way around.”

The Berlin-based architects count themselves fortunate to have the machine-tool company Trumpf as a repeat client. Working with über-engineer Werner Sobek, Barkow Leibinger used Trumpf’s own technology to build a new gatehouse of laser-cut and welded sheet metal on the company’s campus in Ditzingen, Germany. The gatehouse consists of a small functional core topped by a honeycombed steel roof that cantilevers an astonishing 20 meters (66 feet) across the street in front of it. Jury member Craig Hodgetts described the cantilever as “just awe-inspiring.” In their submission, the architects say they wouldn’t have been able to pull it off five years ago.

Barkow Leibinger submitted a portfolio of several cutting/casting projects, including a complex façade of 3D and 2D polygonal, mirrored glass panels for an office building in Seoul, Korea, and a restaurant ceiling infilled with glulam wood cells. But it was the gatehouse and its roof that wowed the jury. “That extruded cut and [fold] actually became a structural roof, and it has a good span,” enthused juror Lauren Crahan. Hodgetts agreed wholeheartedly: “That was a killer—when the thing goes, like, all the way out there … Kabam!”


  • Regine Leibinger and Frank Barkow
    Regine Leibinger and Frank Barkow

Trumpf Campus Gatehouse, Ditzingen, Germany

Client Trumpf, Ditzingen, Germany

Architect Barkow Leibinger Architects, Berlin—Frank Barkow, Regine Leibinger (principals); Carten Krafft (design project architect); Caspar Hoesch (construction project architect); Meredith Atkinson (design team)

Construction Management Gassmann + Grossmann

Structural Engineer Werner Sobek Ingenieure

Landscaping Büro Kiefer

Façades Arup Berlin (concept); Werner Sobek Ingenieure (realization)

2009 R+D Awards

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    Dynamic Descent

    Dean/Wolf Architects designs a folded stainless steel staircase for a Manhattan townhouse.

     
  • A mock-up of the SFIS with bundled plastic bottles. Most plastic water bottles are discarded with the caps on; capped, empty bottles are airtight and can be placed within a concrete structure to create a void. Hydrostatic pressure from wet concrete will only nominally reduce the air volume inside the bottles.

    Sustainable Form-Inclusion System

    Skidmore, Owings & Merrill design a prototype system that uses plastic bottles, bags, and other compressed waste to lighten and fill spaces in concrete slabs.