Launch Slideshow

University of Michigan Musem of Art, Ann Arbor, Mich.

University of Michigan Musem of Art, Ann Arbor, Mich.

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/UnivOfMichiganMuseumOfArt1_tcm20-778910.jpg?width=500

    true

    500

    Jeremy Bittermann

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/UnivOfMichiganMuseumOfArt2_tcm20-778911.jpg?width=500

    true

    500

    Richard Barnes

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/UnivOfMichiganMuseumOfArt3_tcm20-778912.jpg?width=500

    true

    500

    Jeremy Bittermann

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/UnivOfMichiganMuseumOfArt4_tcm20-778913.jpg?width=500

    true

    500

    Courtesy Allied Works Architecture

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/UnivOfMichiganMuseumOfArt5_tcm20-778909.jpg?width=330

    true

    330

    Jeremy Bittermann

  • http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/UnivOfMichiganMuseumOfArt6_tcm20-780054.jpg

    true

    600

    Richard Barnes

    University of Michigan Art Museum

The new wing of the University of Michigan Museum of Art is located on a primary pedestrian route near the heart of the campus and creates a prominent gateway to the university’s art collection for both students and the public. The building expands the physical space of the existing 1910 Beaux Arts structure, which benefited from a restoration and modernization.

Jury: “A new addition to an existing historic building reads as a new building and true to itself.”

Client: “One of the primary goals of the project was to formulate a design that would attract students to enter the building and become influenced by the art contained within. The architect located a major gallery in the corner of the building with significant exposure to the pedestrian route and used similar materials and a simple modern form that does not compete with the architectural vocabulary of the existing historic buildings. The investment [in hiring the architects] is a small price to pay for securing an outcome that will have a lasting influence on campus for the next century.”  —Douglas Hanna, university architect