• BOOK 
The perfect typeface does not yet exist, Jan Tschichold said in 1935. The calligrapher revolutionized graphic design by marrying two relatively new forms: the sans serif typeface Futura and advertising photography. Tschichold later disavowed Futura (it reminded him of fascism) and created the conservative serif Sabon as a way to bring ultimate clarity in communication. Jan Tschichold¡ Master Typographer: His Life, Work and Legacy (edited by Cees W. de Jong) illuminates his thinking. 
$75; Thames  Hudson

    Credit: Mike Morgan

    BOOK
    "The perfect typeface does not yet exist," Jan Tschichold said in 1935. The calligrapher revolutionized graphic design by marrying two relatively new forms: the sans serif typeface Futura and advertising photography. Tschichold later disavowed Futura (it reminded him of fascism) and created the conservative serif Sabon as a way to bring ultimate clarity in communication. Jan Tschichold¡ Master Typographer: His Life, Work and Legacy (edited by Cees W. de Jong) illuminates his thinking.
    $75; Thames & Hudson


  • EXHIBIT 
Illuminated models of 20 projects by Laboratory of Architecture, the Mexico City firm led by Fernando Romero, share space with large photographs of a U.S./Mexico border in transition at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Museum of Art. Feb. 28-May 31.
cmoa.org

    Credit: Carnegie Museum of Art

    EXHIBIT
    Illuminated models of 20 projects by Laboratory of Architecture, the Mexico City firm led by Fernando Romero, share space with large photographs of a U.S./Mexico border in transition at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Museum of Art. Feb. 28-May 31.
    cmoa.org


  • EXHIBIT 
The ancient Trypilians thrived for nearly three millennia in a place we now call Ukraine. They built sophisticated settlements of two-story houses but burned them down every 60 to 80 years. No one knows why. Artifacts and hypotheses are on display in Mysteries of the Ancient Ukraine: The Remarkable Trypilian Culture (5400-2700 BC) at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Through March 22.
www.rom.on.ca

    Credit: Royal Ontario Museum

    EXHIBIT
    The ancient Trypilians thrived for nearly three millennia in a place we now call Ukraine. They built sophisticated settlements of two-story houses but burned them down every 60 to 80 years. No one knows why. Artifacts and hypotheses are on display in Mysteries of the Ancient Ukraine: The Remarkable Trypilian Culture (5400-2700 BC) at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Through March 22.
    www.rom.on.ca


  • BOOK
Tiny Houses measures less than 7 inches square but looks like it will be the new big thing in the carbon footprint conversation. Mimi Zeiger, editor of Loud Paper and an ARCHITECT contributor, presents an international collection of more than 30 homes, each under 1,000 square feet, that together make a case for microgreen living. 
$29.95; Rizzoli

    Credit: Mike Morgan

    BOOK
    Tiny Houses measures less than 7 inches square but looks like it will be the new big thing in the carbon footprint conversation. Mimi Zeiger, editor of Loud Paper and an ARCHITECT contributor, presents an international collection of more than 30 homes, each under 1,000 square feet, that together make a case for "microgreen living."
    $29.95; Rizzoli


  • EXHIBIT 
German wunderkind Jurgen Mayer H. immerses museumgoers in a sound and video experience at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The installation is driven by an unlikely muse: data protection patterns, those ubiquitous, dense compositions of numbers, letters, and logos on bank envelopes and shipping labels. Mayer H., an architect and artist, calls them information mist. Through July 7.
sfmoma.org

    Credit: J. Mayer H., Courtesy SFMoMA

    EXHIBIT
    German wunderkind Jurgen Mayer H. immerses museumgoers in a sound and video experience at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The installation is driven by an unlikely muse: data protection patterns, those ubiquitous, dense compositions of numbers, letters, and logos on bank envelopes and shipping labels. Mayer H., an architect and artist, calls them "information mist." Through July 7.
    sfmoma.org


  • EXHIBIT 
Science made a lot of buzz in Charles Darwin's day. The big news was about something very old: the world's dramatic prehistory, freshly revealed in geological and paleontological discoveries. Nineteenth-century artists (like American painter Thomas Cole, whose The Subsiding of the Waters of the Deluge is shown above) helped spread the word by re-envisioning the natural landscape. Now, 150 years after the publication of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, the Yale Center for British Art revisits the a-ha moment in the exhibition 'Endless forms': Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts. Feb. 12-May 3.
yale.edu/ycba
Hannah McCann

    Credit: Smithsonian Museum of American Art

    EXHIBIT
    Science made a lot of buzz in Charles Darwin's day. The big news was about something very old: the world's dramatic prehistory, freshly revealed in geological and paleontological discoveries. Nineteenth-century artists (like American painter Thomas Cole, whose The Subsiding of the Waters of the Deluge is shown above) helped spread the word by re-envisioning the natural landscape. Now, 150 years after the publication of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, the Yale Center for British Art revisits the a-ha moment in the exhibition "'Endless forms': Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts." Feb. 12-May 3.
    yale.edu/ycba
    Hannah McCann

For more news from the culture front, visit Hannah McCann's blog at architecturemagazine.com.