Model of Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum made with icing, cotton candy, candy wrappers, licorice, sugar, and gingerbread.

Model of Frank Lloyd Wright's Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum made with icing, cotton candy, candy wrappers, licorice, sugar, and gingerbread.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin


Frank Lloyd Wright probably never imagined what his Guggenheim would look like coated in frosting. (Although plenty of other people have.) The building materials for a new series of models, however, sound a lot more like a three-year-old's dream breakfast order than anything resembling bricks and mortar.

Photographer Henry Hargreaves partnered with food stylist Caitlin Levin to imagine some of the world's most famous museums in mini, using candy. These too-pretty-to-eat models will be on display at the Dylan's Candy Bar store in Miami Beach starting Friday in connection with the Art Basel show this week. They will travel to New York in January, according to a Dylan's Candy Bar spokesperson.

"We wanted the photos themselves to resemble architectural images of the buildings, hence the black and white," Hargreaves writes in an email. Watch their video for some glimpses of what these sweet structures look like IRL.

A model of Zaha Hadid Architects' MAXXI: Museum of XXI Century Arts (Rome) built with gingerbread, hard candy, and lollipop sticks.

A model of Zaha Hadid Architects' MAXXI: Museum of XXI Century Arts (Rome) built with gingerbread, hard candy, and lollipop sticks.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin

Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern (London) constructed with gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, and bubble gum.

Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern (London) constructed with gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, and bubble gum.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin


The duo built Yasui Hideo Atelier's building at the Hiroshi Senju Museum Karuizawa (Nagano, Japan) with materials that included chocolate, cotton candy, and gingerbread.

The duo built Yasui Hideo Atelier's building at the Hiroshi Senju Museum Karuizawa (Nagano, Japan) with materials that included chocolate, cotton candy, and gingerbread.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin


The model of I.M. Pei's pyramid at the Louvre (Paris) is made of hard candy, licorice, and gingerbread.

The model of I.M. Pei's pyramid at the Louvre (Paris) is made of hard candy, licorice, and gingerbread.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin


The model of Fernando Romero Enterprise's (FREE) Museo Soumaya (Mexico City) is made from candy balls, sour rolls, taffy, and gingerbread.

The model of Fernando Romero Enterprise's (FREE) Museo Soumaya (Mexico City) is made from candy balls, sour rolls, taffy, and gingerbread.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin


Neutelings Riedijk Architects' Museum aan de Stroom (Antwerp, Belgium) made of Lego candy, hard candy, chocolate, bubble gum, sour rolls, sesame candy, and gingerbread.

Neutelings Riedijk Architects' Museum aan de Stroom (Antwerp, Belgium) made of Lego candy, hard candy, chocolate, bubble gum, sour rolls, sesame candy, and gingerbread.

Credit: Courtesy of Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin