EXHIBIT
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One of the many odd remnants of New York’s 1964 World’s Fair is a pair of open-air fiberglass pavilions on the waterfront near the Mets’ new Citi Field. In <strong xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">The Candela Structures: A New York City History Mystery</strong>, an exhibit at Brooklyn’s The City Reliquary Museum &amp; Civic Organization, journalist Paul Lukas and architect Kirsten Hively unearth the strange story behind the structures and expose some of the myths that have developed about them over the past decades. Through June 28.
<br xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"></br><a title="candelastructures.org" href="http://candelastructures.org" target="_blank" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">candelastructures.org</a>

EXHIBIT
One of the many odd remnants of New York’s 1964 World’s Fair is a pair of open-air fiberglass pavilions on the waterfront near the Mets’ new Citi Field. In The Candela Structures: A New York City History Mystery, an exhibit at Brooklyn’s The City Reliquary Museum & Civic Organization, journalist Paul Lukas and architect Kirsten Hively unearth the strange story behind the structures and expose some of the myths that have developed about them over the past decades. Through June 28.
candelastructures.org

Credit: Courtesy Owens Corning