• In Dr. Memar: The Store, a Chicago skincare boutique, architect David Hoffman specified two products that aren't quite what they seem.

    Credit: Massey Hoffman Architects

    In Dr. Memar: The Store, a Chicago skincare boutique, architect David Hoffman specified two products that aren't quite what they seem.
For a generation of architects now well into maturity, Z-BRICK was a ubiquitous presence in their youth. Almost every American suburban home built during the late 1950s and 1960s seemed to use the lightweight, bricklike finish to provide a paper-thin sense of durability and permanence. What was the material's downfall? It was phony! Not just fake, but as counterfeit as a three-dollar bill. More than half a century since its introduction, Z-BRICK is still produced by the Minnesota-based company that invented it—although most architects looking to do masonry facing on a budget opt for prefabricated panels that incorporate real, 4-inch-thick masonry units.

  • For the flooring, he chose Apavisa's Lava Antracita Natural tile, which mimics the Italian volcanic stone Balsatina at a much lower cost.

    Credit: Caeserstone

    For the flooring, he chose Apavisa's Lava Antracita Natural tile, which mimics the Italian volcanic stone Balsatina at a much lower cost.
Architects have probably been faking it for as long as there have been architects. Le Corbusier's seminal Villa Savoye outside Paris was meant to invoke the machine aesthetic in ocean liners, airplanes, and automobiles. But the large undifferentiated surfaces that define the main volume of the building are not made of metal, like his references. They're stucco on masonry—a building technique that would have seemed ordinary to Vitruvius in the first century.

  • For the countertop, Hoffman used Caesarstone-a reconstituted quartz material that he likes because it doesn't pretend to be something else.

    Credit: APAVISA

    For the countertop, Hoffman used Caesarstone-a reconstituted quartz material that he likes because it "doesn't pretend to be something else."
It's only recently that we've become accustomed to “honesty” in materials as a requirement. A short survey of current offerings finds that we might be getting over this decidedly Calvinist prescription. But there remains some difference of opinion, and most architects draw a distinct line between phony (the fakest of the fakes) and faux (which might be described as Vitruvius minus Calvin).