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More stories about ARIZONA

  • We Don't Need More Housing, We Need Smarter Housing

    The NAHB says the best way to kick-start the economy is to build more housing. But we've already got enough right now. Instead, let's make development a smarter, more-sustainable business.

  • AIA Announces Upjohn Initiative Recipients

    Four applied-research projects have been awarded a grant by the AIA Upjohn Research Initiative, which provides base funds for research that advances professional architectural knowledge and practice.

  • Juliet Rice Wichman Botanical Research Center

    Dean Sakamoto Architects designed the research center at the National Tropical Botanical Garden to be both hurricane-resistant and the first LEED building on Kauai.

  • Buckeye, Next 6 Exits

    Between 2000 and 2006, Arizona's Maricopa county gained nearly 700,000 new residents, making it the fastest-growing county in the united states. Its fastest-growing town, once a faded highway pit stop, is now a 25,000-person phoenix exurb—that could swell

  • The Science and Art of Light

    Architecture today often is praised for its tectonics, floating volumes, and sensational, gravity-defying stunts of “starchitecture.” Yet, very so often there is a building that inspires descriptions of the sublime, the experiential, and the power of light and architecture to transcend our...

  • Robert R. Smith

    Director of Facilities Design and Construction, University of Arizona

  • Tucson, Ariz.

    The Sonoran Desert city of Tucson is more than sunshine and golf. There's a top university and an emerging high-tech industry, too.

  • Taliesin Rising

    Facing loss of accreditation, the Frank Lloyd Wright school rebuilds from within

  • Jeff Speck Departs NEA for Private Practice

    After nearly four years on the job, National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) director of design Jeff Speck announced in late March he would leave his post to return to private practice as a city planner.

  • Sweet Earth: Experimental Utopias in America

    In the Sweet Earth series of photographs and accompanying texts, artist Joel Sternfeld documents Utopian communities across the United States—several centuries' worth of experiments in alternative place-making.