The Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture include an international project (K&L Gates at One New Change in London), Knoll's Flagship Showroom and Offices, and two projects that also won awards in the architecture category: the Pierre by Olson Kundig Architects, and the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust by Belzberg Architects.

For more on each project from our ARCHITECT Project Gallery, click the link on the project name.

Credit: Matthew Millman


Bar Agricole, San Francisco
Aidlin Darling Design, San Francisco

Client: “We wanted everything you touch, from the linens to the walls, to have substance—the quality of materials speaks to the quality of ingredients. And we hoped to capture the unique feel of San Francisco’s agricultural and urban surroundings.” —Thad Vogler, co-owner, Bar Agricole

Jury: “There is a lot of texture where so often we see so much minimalism and sleek crafting. One of the nicest things is the way it manipulates the diner’s experience.”


Credit: Paul Warchol


SoHo Loft Residence, New York
Gabellini Sheppard Associates, New York

Architect: “We strove for a balance between American and Scandinavian sensibilities, functional preferences and models of domestic living. The entire space and organization is based on light—when ambient natural light hits the art on the walls, the loft comes to life.” —Michael Gabellini, FAIA, founding partner, Gabellini Sheppard Associates

Jury: “The design combines Scandinavian and American character. It is a great frame for the client’s outstanding art collection.”


Credit: Richard Bryant


K&L Gates at One New Change, London
Lehman Smith McLeish, Washington, D.C.

Client: “Debra Lehman-Smith’s design gave us a new, multidisciplinary approach to the way we organize ourselves and demonstrate value to our clients. Our revenues in London have grown by 35 percent in the last four years—something we simply would not have seen without LSM and their design ideas.” —Tony Griffiths, administrative partner, K&L Gates

Jury: “The detailing is thoughtful and sensitive, and the spaces draw your eyes without a lot of fanfare. The design is subtle, clean, spare, and strong.”


Credit: Elizabeth Felicella


Knoll Flagship Showroom, Offices, and Shop, New York
Architecture Research Office, New York

Architect: “Knoll envisioned its showroom as a return to midtown—they wanted to transform the industrial space and culture they had in the Meatpacking District into 3.5 floors of a midtown skyscraper. The goal was to increase individual workspace and opportunities for collaborative work, and to create an office that’s an extension of the showroom itself.” —Kim Yao, AIA, principal, Architecture Research Office

Jury: “The interiors of this project have everything. They tell a good story about furniture design, displaying Knoll products and illustrating how they should be used. They are well integrated, well laid out, and purposeful.”


Credit: Benny Chan


Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, Los Angeles
Belzberg Architects, Santa Monica, Calif.

Client: “The task was to create an interior that lets you explore these original artifacts, and, simultaneously, remember the dead. Hagy Belzberg, FAIA’s humanity and his reverence for these men and women shines through in every detail. This museum holds the Holocaust’s victims and survivors at its center, at its heart.” —Samara Hutman, executive director, Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust

Jury: “The whole effect is enhanced by the gradients of the light, which are torqued and reflective on the interior of the space.”


Credit: Scott Frances


Marc by Marc Jacobs Showroom, New York
Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects, New York, and HLW International, New York

Client: “Two of our goals were seemingly mutually exclusive: maximize daylight and airiness, but make sure that the showroom’s various zones were distinct and discreet. In addition, the layout had to be flexible. Adding to that challenge, construction had to be finished in three months. Most importantly, we needed a showroom that was an extension of Marc by Marc Jacobs, so that visitors have a seamless experience of the brand.” —Marc by Marc Jacobs

Jury: “It is moody in a good way. The blue-tinted glass, surrounding the central space, pulls your eyes down from the ceiling. It makes you look at a showroom in a way that you wouldn’t anticipate. Lighting is a critical element.”


Credit: Benjamin Benschneider


The Pierre, San Juan Islands, Wash.
Olson Kundig Architects, Seattle

Architect: “The client has lived on the site for years. She wanted her memories—and her incredible art collection—to be embedded into the architecture.” —Tom Kundig, FAIA, principal and owner, Olson Kundig Architects

Jury: “It makes you ponder the perception of concrete as constructed rock. The industrial detailing is unexpected and works so well.”


Credit: Lara Swimmer


Odegaard Undergraduate Library & Learning Commons, Seattle
The Miller Hull Partnership, Seattle

Client: “The renovation of Odegaard has been nothing short of transformational. Not only has it brought beauty and light to a tired, heavily used building, it has also created new spaces for collaborative and individual learning. The students love it.” —Jill McKinstry, director, Odegaard Undergraduate Library at the University of Washington

Jury: “It is well detailed. The railing facet and how it falls into the underside of the structure is amazing. Both artificial and natural light are important to the project. This is an excellent example of architectural renovation.”


Credit: Eric Staudenmaier


Venture Capital Office Headquarters, Menlo Park, Calif.
Paul Murdoch Architects, Beverly Hills, Calif., and Kappe Architects Planners, Pacific Palisades, Calif.

Architect: “While expressing the firm’s bold, risk-taking ventures, we also wanted to create a warm environment where employees could feel at home in a garden setting.” —Paul Murdoch, AIA, president, Paul Murdoch Architects

Jury: “It pulls you back a generation in a fresh way. It is extremely sustainable, and the prefabrication is well done.”