Launch Slideshow

Himma Architecture Studio/Office dA

Himma Architecture Studio/Office dA

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    The building's skin was inspired by the client's own business: fashion. Reminiscent of a pleated skirt, down to the suggestion of a bent leg along the main façade, the screen wraps the building like a piece of clothing, masking a simple, clean-lined form.

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    The polygonal "pleats" were inspired by such fashion elements as a dress pattern.

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    The building's skin was inspired by the client's own business: fashion. Reminiscent of a pleated skirt, down to the suggestion of a bent leg along the main façade, the screen wraps the building like a piece of clothing, masking a simple, clean-lined form.

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    The polygonal "pleats" were inspired by such fashion elements as a dress pattern.

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    Section The section plan of the building) allows maximum light into the entry spaces and fosters communication between the different clothing brands operating in the doubleheight studios.

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    Wall section The perforated metal skin helps control glare without the need for shades, in part because of the angle of the pleating. Metal is laid over a support framework that is suspended from the glass curtain wall, which in turn attaches to the structural system of the building.

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    Façade layers The perforated metal skin helps control glare without the need for shades, in part because of the angle of the pleating. Metal is laid over a support framework that is suspended from the glass curtain wall, which in turn attaches to the structural system of the building.

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    The size of the infill site informed several programming choices, including the combination of the building's lobby with one of its showcase spaces: the theater and catwalk.

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    The visual connection to the sidewalk serves to remind fashion show viewers of the people the clothing is designed for. In the double-height spaces on the upper floors, the diamond shape of the structural columns is meant to reflect the pleating and perforations of the skin outside.

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    Floor plan The size of the infill site informed several programming choices, including the combination of the building's lobby with one of its showcase spaces: the theater and catwalk.

It is fitting that the new headquarters for Obzee, a company that owns several fashion labels, is so influenced by the clothes designed within. Located on an urban infill site in Seoul, Korea, the building is an eight-story tower wrapped in its own piece of clothing: a pleated and perforated metal skin. The gathers and drape of the skin are heavily influenced by the architects' research into tailoring, down to the diamond-shaped perforations that resemble cutouts from a dress pattern and a supporting structure that is reminiscent in both form and principle to a crinoline. This support structure is anchored to a glass curtain wall that encloses the concrete structure, which retains a diamond pattern in the system of beams that support ascending floors. The fluidity of the skin belies the rectilinear form of the building underneath, a contrast that intrigued the jury. Julie Snow commented, “The interesting thing about the box itself is how it's structured, and the fact that the pleated exterior fabric works against those forms. That's probably the strength of the project—instead of it taking this sort of formal shaping, it took a structural shaping.” Juror Thomas Phifer echoed her sentiment: “The way the volume finally behind all of these elaborate screens and structures is simple and doesn't respond to the different characteristics makes the skin object like and special, and I think it actually makes it stronger.”

The interior program of the building combines spaces in an attempt to get the most out of a small floorplate. A double-height lobby combines the entry and the company's showplace: a theater and runway for fashion shows. Double-height atria on the upper floors, creating overlooks from one studio space (and clothing brand) into another, facilitate communication and maximize light. The top floor has clean-lined executive offices and space for parties and events. The geometry of the beams and the skin seen through windows serve as the main foci in an otherwise clean and open interior. This effect resonated with Snow, who said, “The skin and the volume and the restraint of this volume is very powerful.”

  • Hailim Suh
    Hailim Suh

  • Monica Ponce de Leon (left) and Nader Tehrani
    Monica Ponce de Leon (left) and Nader Tehrani

Project: Obzee Fashion Headquarters

Location:
Seoul, Korea

Architect:
Himma Architecture Studio, Seoul and New York/Office dA, Boston-Hailim Suh (principal in charge)/Nader Tehrani (principal in charge), Monica Ponce de Leon (principal); Young-Il Park/Richard Lee (project coordinators); Seunghyun Kim, Jae-hyung Park, In-su Zang/Brandon Clifford, Christian Ervin (project team)

Year Founded:
1997/1991

Number of Employees:
10/19

Engineers:
TNI Stuctural Engineering (structural); SUN-WOO Engineering (mechanical); Jung-Myoung Engineering Group (electrical); GAYUN Engineering & Construction (civil) Client: Obzee Co.

Cost:
withheld

Size:
25,726 square feet

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