Launch Slideshow

The Langelinie and Marmormolen towers form the LM Harbor Gateway, which serves as the new entry point to Copenhagen Harbor. The office towers are connected by a cable-stay bridge suspended 213 feet above the waters surface.

LM Harbor Gateway

Steven Holl Architects

LM Harbor Gateway

Steven Holl Architects

  • The Langelinie and Marmormolen towers form the LM Harbor Gateway, which serves as the new entry point to Copenhagen Harbor. The office towers are connected by a cable-stay bridge suspended 213 feet above the waters surface.

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    The Langelinie and Marmormolen towers form the LM Harbor Gateway, which serves as the new entry point to Copenhagen Harbor. The office towers are connected by a cable-stay bridge suspended 213 feet above the waters surface.

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    Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

    The Langelinie and Marmormolen towers form the LM Harbor Gateway, which serves as the new entry point to Copenhagen Harbor. The office towers are connected by a cable-stay bridge suspended 213 feet above the water’s surface.

  • The tinted areas on this building section identify the spaces that are accessible to the public. Escalators rise from the ground level to elevators, which access the connecting bridge; a public observation deck tops each tower.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpD7B9%2Etmp_tcm20-283742.jpg

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    The tinted areas on this building section identify the spaces that are accessible to the public. Escalators rise from the ground level to elevators, which access the connecting bridge; a public observation deck tops each tower.

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    Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

    The tinted areas on this building section identify the spaces that are accessible to the public. Escalators rise from the ground level to elevators, which access the connecting bridge; a public observation deck tops each tower.

  • Because of the orientation of the two harbor piers and the massing of the buildings, the bridge meets at an angle, a move that the architects liken to a handshake.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpD7B4%2Etmp_tcm20-283689.jpg

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    Because of the orientation of the two harbor piers and the massing of the buildings, the bridge meets at an angle, a move that the architects liken to a handshake.

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    Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

    Because of the orientation of the two harbor piers and the massing of the buildings, the bridge meets at an angle, a move that the architects liken to a handshake.

  • Each side of the bridge is identified by a color (yellow for Marmormolen, orange for Langelinie) on both the ceiling and the underside of the bridge. This color system indicates when visitors pass from one building to the next. At night, the bridge is lit from below, and its colors reflect onto the water.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpD7B5%2Etmp_tcm20-283696.jpg

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    Each side of the bridge is identified by a color (yellow for Marmormolen, orange for Langelinie) on both the ceiling and the underside of the bridge. This color system indicates when visitors pass from one building to the next. At night, the bridge is lit from below, and its colors reflect onto the water.

    600

    Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

    Each side of the bridge is identified by a color (yellow for Marmormolen, orange for Langelinie) on both the ceiling and the underside of the bridge. This color system indicates when visitors pass from one building to the next. At night, the bridge is lit from below, and its colors reflect onto the water.

  • This watercolor sketch highlights the Gateways bridging of land and sea. The observation deck on each building is oriented toward the representative vistathe open water for orange Langelinie, the city skyline for yellow Marmormolen.

    http://www.architectmagazine.com/Images/tmpD7B8%2Etmp_tcm20-283725.jpg

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    This watercolor sketch highlights the Gateways bridging of land and sea. The observation deck on each building is oriented toward the representative vistathe open water for orange Langelinie, the city skyline for yellow Marmormolen.

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    Courtesy Steven Holl Architects

    This watercolor sketch highlights the Gateway’s bridging of land and sea. The observation deck on each building is oriented toward the representative vista—the open water for orange Langelinie, the city skyline for yellow Marmormolen.

What If the Quickest Way From Point A to Point B Was to Walk Across the Sky?
LM Harbor Gateway / Steven Holl Architects

Site
Two piers forming the entrance to Copenhagen Harbor.

Program
A pair of towers with more than 600,000 combined square feet of office space, civic areas, and a suspension bridge providing a public circulation path 200 feet above the harbor.

Solution
Designed to create a dramatic new entryway to Copenhagen Harbor, this pair of towers designed by Steven Holl Architects symbolically represents the connecting point between the city and the water. The Langelinie Tower is located on a long, curving pier that serves as a berth for large ocean-bound ships. Its sister Marmormolen Tower stands on a pier more directly connected to the city center. At 25 and 23 stories, respectively, the buildings provide a combined 624,500 square feet of space. But the hallmark of this complex is not the increased density or height in a relatively low-rise context. It is the grand gesture of the cable-stay bridge that projects from both buildings to meet at an angle in the center, 213 feet above the surface of the water. “It is a statement,” juror Adele Chatfield-Taylor said.

More than just a way of connecting the two buildings for tenants, the bridge serves as a public circulation path, with escalators and elevators connecting it to ground level. The soffits under each side of the bridge will be vividly painted and lit at night to enhance the effect. Rather than write the bridge off as a gimmick, the jury was convinced that it is integral to the project’s worth. “You can make a fantastic gesture, but then you have to actually be able to make it work,” juror Stan Allen said. “And there’s a level of development here that makes me convinced that that’s possible.”

Project Credits

Project LM Harbor Gateway, Copenhagen
Client ATP Ejendomme
Architect Steven Holl Architects, New York—Steven Holl (principal); Noah Yaffe (associate in charge); Chris McVoy (project adviser); Rashid Satti (competition project architect); Justin Allen, Esin Erez, Runar Halldorsson, Fiorenza Matteoni (project team)
Structural Engineer HNTB Corp.—Ted Zoli (bridge structural engineer)
Mechanical Engineer Niras
Climate Consultant Transsolar
Size 624,500 square feet