Drape Wall / Cloak Wall

Preliminary sketches document the initial attempts to turn the Drape Wall concept into a comprehensive design for a single-family house.

In the Drape Wall system, vacuum-formed plastic bricks snap together on an aluminum frame, creating the rainscreen exterior of this housing prototype.

In the final Drape Wall system, some bricks are perforated, serving as windows. These perforated bricks allow controlled airflow into the space and views from the interior.

A felt "drape" layer lines the interior surface of the wall system. It is backed with a blue layer of waterproofing to weatherproof the house (the exterior bricks serve only as a rainscreen). Insulating felt forms storage pockets and can be pulled aside to allow access to the "windows"-perforations in some exterior bricks.

MANUFACTURING Drape Wall bricks are vacuum-molded over milled forms that correspond to every brick configuration available.

PROTOTYPES The Drape Wall system is being continuously refined, and new brick prototypes are being manufactured for testing. One option is engineered for greater flexibility in overall house design, using circular forms to allow bricks to interlock at 10, 45, and 90 degrees.

PROTOTYPES The Drape Wall system is being continuously refined, and new brick prototypes are being manufactured for testing. One prototype, based on research by mechanical engineering students, provides for flexible spacing of the bricks, permitting more or less ventilation as climate conditions in different areas dictate. This latter system is the driver for the design of a full-scale installation called the Drape House.

INTERIOR FELT "DRAPE" Preliminary sketches for the felt drape system will be manufactured into large-scale mockups.

INTERIOR FELT "DRAPE" Preliminary sketches for the felt drape system have been manufactured into large-scale mockups. There are voids in the felt to give access to the blue vapor barrier, and zippered pockets so that residents can actively use the surface for storage.

INTERIOR FELT "DRAPE" Preliminary sketches for the felt drape system have been manufactured into large-scale mockups. There are voids in the felt to give access to the blue vapor barrier, and zippered pockets so that residents can actively use the surface for storage.

Created as part of the Goldstein Museum of Design's Here by Design III exhibition, the Cloak Wall system includes several advancements over Drape Wall, including discrete window openings. The bricks are held together by compression as opposed to being locked to a separate aluminum frame.

The insulating felt quilt lining the interior surface of Cloak Wall has a separate ETFE plastic waterproofing barrier that is hung behind the felt.

The insulating felt quilt lining the interior surface of Cloak Wall has a separate ETFE plastic waterproofing barrier that is hung behind the felt.

In addition to storage pockets, the felt quilt in Cloak Wall incorporates systems such as LED lights and wires for radiant heating and cooling, making it a much more active part of the interior environment than previous iterations were.

EXPLODED DIAGRAM Three main layers-performative bricks, ETFE waterproofing, and felt quilt-form the wall structure, but each can be tweaked to customize a home for a specific environment. For example, air pockets in the ETFE layer can be filled to increase or decrease insulation as ambient temperatures dictate.

ELEVATION COLOR STUDY Cloak Wall uses a high-performance automotive paint on the exterior, which gives the appearance of changing colors as light angles shift season to season. When the sun's light is at a low angle or dim, the paint appears darker, soaking up and trapping more heat. During summer months when the sun is higher, the paint appears lighter, reflecting heat to keep the house cool.

ELEVATION COLOR STUDY Cloak Wall uses a high-performance automotive paint on the exterior, which gives the appearance of changing colors as light angles shift season to season. When the sun's light is at a low angle or dim, the paint appears darker, soaking up and trapping more heat. During summer months when the sun is higher, the paint appears lighter, reflecting heat to keep the house cool.

ELEVATION COLOR STUDY Cloak Wall uses a high-performance automotive paint on the exterior, which gives the appearance of changing colors as light angles shift season to season. When the sun's light is at a low angle or dim, the paint appears darker, soaking up and trapping more heat. During summer months when the sun is higher, the paint appears lighter, reflecting heat to keep the house cool.

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