Esto Gallery: The Great Parking Garages

Robert Law Weed and Associates Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto This 1949 garage is one of Weed’s contributions to the master plan for the University of Miami; the school has one of the first campuses in the country with exclusively Modern buildings.

Robert Law Weed and Associates Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto Robert Law Weed’s Bauhaus-inspired Miami split-level garage.

Paul Rudolph Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto In 1962, Paul Rudolph, then the dean of the Yale School of Architecture, designed this Temple Street Garage in New Haven, Conn. In Rudolph’s obituary, The New York Times called it “a dynamic horizontal composition of concrete” that was “the first design since Frank Lloyd Wright’s that sought to create a place of dignity for the car.”

Paul Rudolph Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto The 700-foot-long Brutalist structure holds 1,300 cars. From its top floor, under concrete cobra lights, you can see the steeples of the New Haven Green.

Paul Rudolph Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto In an interview with John Wesley Cook, Rudolph said of his Temple Street garage: “The one in New Haven comes from the design of throughways. Most parking garages are merely skeletal structures which didn't get any walls. They are just office building structures with the glass left out. I wanted to make a building which said it dealt with cars and movement. I wanted there to be no doubt that this is a parking garage.”

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto This innovative 1965 design by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill for a Macy’s in Queens ringed the circular store with parking, so that shoppers could more directly access their department of choice.

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Photographer: Ezra Stoller © Esto Customers enter and exit the store via helical ramps in these twin cylindrical structures.

Bertrand Goldberg Photographer: Susan Carr © Esto Marina City, Bertrand Goldberg’s 65-story mixed-use Chicago towers with scalloped edges and a corncob-like facade, were once the tallest reinforced concrete structures in the world. From the exterior, the lower floors of parking ramps are indistinguishable from the apartments above. Completed in 1965, Marina City is now home to the House of Blues concert hall.

Herzog & de Meuron Photographer: David Sundberg © Esto Herzog & de Meuron’s garage, which has hosted weddings and bar mitzvahs, is populated with a menagerie of million-dollar sculptures. Its developer, contemporary art collector Robert Wennet, also commissioned a rooftop penthouse.

Herzog & de Meuron Photographer: David Sundberg © Esto A dizzying precipice on the Lincoln Road garage

Join the Discussion

Please read our Content Guidelines before posting

Close X