From Lions to Lemurs

The façade of the historic Lion House was restored using the same materials-including limestone, Roman ironspot brick, copper roofing, and terra-cotta cornice pieces-as the original Heins and LaFarge design.

The interior space that was occupied by the cages now houses the bulk of the exhibit space. Materials removed from the building, such as sandstone panels and red tiles, were reused in the reconstruction or will find a place in the new Center for Global Conservation that is taking shape nearby on the zoo campus.

True restoration was only performed in areas where the use remained the same. In other areas, such as the building's east façade, a restructuring occurred, albeit one that recalls the original construction. Cages were removed and replaced with metal grilles over etched stainless steel panels.

True restoration was only performed in areas where the use remained the same.

In other areas, such as the building's east façade, a restructuring occurred, albeit one that recalls the original construction.

RING-TAILED LEMUR

FOSSA

TOMATO FROG

RED FODY

FIRST FLOOR PLAN An additional 6,000 square feet was excavated from the cellar level to accommodate life support systems, animal holding, storage, and pantry and mechanical space (left).

CELLAR PLAN An additional 6,000 square feet was excavated from the cellar level to accommodate life support systems, animal holding, storage, and pantry and mechanical space (left).

An additional 6,000 square feet was excavated from the cellar level to accommodate life support systems, animal holding, storage, and pantry and mechanical space (left).

COLLARED LEMUR

GIANT DAY GECKO

RING-TAILED MONGOOSE

Low, suspended wood-grille ceilings in the darkened exhibit areas (far left) are a contrast to the high, bright ceilings in the habitat areas, where skylights admit daylight for the benefit of the plants and animals.

Infill panels on the east wall (left) in veneers of recycled wood finished in a rich zebra pattern cover the spaces that used to house lion cage openings (opposite top).

Inserted at the north end of the Schi. Family Great Hall (left) and in front of the main entry doors (opposite middle left) is a discrete volume with restrooms below and a glass-enclosed meeting room above. The base of the mezzanine is clad in large panels of limestone and detailed with bands of stainless steel. The upper-level room, which is equipped with darkening shades, can be used for breakout sessions, small luncheons, or as a bride's dressing room.

Inserted at the north end of the Schi. Family Great Hall (left) and in front of the main entry doors (opposite middle left) is a discrete volume with restrooms below and a glass-enclosed meeting room above. The base of the mezzanine is clad in large panels of limestone and detailed with bands of stainless steel. The upper-level room, which is equipped with darkening shades, can be used for breakout sessions, small luncheons, or as a bride's dressing room.

Structural members and mechanical systems are hidden as much as possible-in some cases, artificial tree trunks or rock formations are strategically placed to encapsulate columns or air ducts (opposite middle right). Most animal support spaces, such as food preparation (left), are housed on the cellar level.

HISSING COCKROACH

MANTELLA FROG

COLLARED LEMUR

Structural members and mechanical systems are hidden as much as possible-in some cases, artificial tree trunks or rock formations are strategically placed to encapsulate columns or air ducts.

Most animal support spaces, such as food preparation, are housed on the cellar level.

MOUSE LEMUR

FOSSA

RING-TAILED MONGOOSE

NILE CROCODILE

RING-TAILED LEMUR

Animal habitats feature high ceilings with ETFE skylight panels. "We needed high levels of UV for the plants, but we didn't want to be designing for the worst degree days of the summertime from a sustainability standpoint," says Smith. Adjustable skylights, which can be darkened remotely by the building automation system, were the ideal solution.

Heating and cooling of the building are aided by five geothermal wells placed near the building perimeter. In tandem with six 28-ton, water-to-water heat pumps, they provide heated or chilled water for heating and cooling. Temperature and water needs for each species can be determined in cellar-level spaces such as the Nile Crocodile Life Support Systems room.

Heating and cooling of the building are aided by five geothermal wells placed near the building perimeter. In tandem with six 28-ton, water-to-water heat pumps, they provide heated or chilled water for heating and cooling. A fuel cell supplies at least half of the energy needs of the Lion House.

COQUEREL’S SIFAKA

RADIATED TORTOISE

NILE CROCODILE

MANTELLA FROG

RED RUFFED LEMUR

RED FODY

Join the Discussion

Please read our Content Guidelines before posting

Close X