Richard Morris Hunt, Revisited

Richard Morris Hunt's original design for Princeton University's Chemical Laboratory, now known as Aaron Burr Hall, was a palazzo-style building, shaped like an L.

An elevation from his original drawings as well as an archival photograph circa 1891 show the masonry walls, taller second and third stories (to provide more light for large lab rooms), and chimneys, which appear at first glance to be crenellations. The Nassau Street entrance (shown) was the building's main entry until the addition was completed.

Allan Greenberg

Thomas Noble

David M. Zaiser

A 1940s two-story addition was demolished to make way for the new addition, which connects more uniformly with the existing Hunt building.

A 1940s two-story addition was demolished to make way for the new addition, which connects more uniformly with the existing Hunt building. The new addition carries through original details, such as the rusticated stone base, the brick coloration, and the coping from Hunt's chimneys (built to carry lab exhaust ), while introducing new design elements, such as the cast stone horizontal bands and the tower, meant to play off of the Collegiate Gothic style that dominates the rest of Princeton's campus.

A 1940s two-story addition (top) was demolished to make way for the new addition (above), which connects more uniformly with the existing Hunt building. The new addition carries through original details, such as the rusticated stone base, the brick coloration, and the coping from Hunt's chimneys (built to carry lab exhaust ), while introducing new design elements, such as the cast stone horizontal bands and the tower, meant to play off of the Collegiate Gothic style that dominates the rest of Princeton's campus (opposite).

A new entrance (opposite), denoted by a glass canopy, is positioned along the façade of the addition, providing an entry close to the heart of campus. When students enter, they can see the old Hunt façades preserved within. Original windows have been converted to display cases for the anthropology department (above left). Steel structural members indicate the perimeter of the self-supporting addition and leave the original façades exposed in lounge areas (above right).

A new entrance (opposite), denoted by a glass canopy, is positioned along the façade of the addition, providing an entry close to the heart of campus. When students enter, they can see the old Hunt façades preserved within. Original windows have been converted to display cases for the anthropology department (above left). Steel structural members indicate the perimeter of the self-supporting addition and leave the original façades exposed in lounge areas (above right).

A new entrance (opposite), denoted by a glass canopy, is positioned along the façade of the addition, providing an entry close to the heart of campus. When students enter, they can see the old Hunt façades preserved within. Original windows have been converted to display cases for the anthropology department (above left). Steel structural members indicate the perimeter of the self-supporting addition and leave the original façades exposed in lounge areas (above right).

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