The Savior of New Orleans?

The Flooding: September 2005 A map of the post-hurricane flooding shows that the depth ranged considerably from neighborhood to neighborhood: less than 4 feet in the French Quarter, for instance, but up to 10 or more feet closer to Lake Pontchartrain.

An early recovery plan called Bring New Orleans Back proposed that some of the worst-hit areas be left to nature as "future parkland" (designated by dashed circles). The plan was met with anger and accusations of racism from many city residents.

Wearing a New Orleans Saints jersey, Ed Blakely leads a public bike ride through the Riverbend and Carrollton neighborhoods, June 3, 2007.

Wearing a New Orleans Saints jersey, Ed Blakely leads a public bike ride through the Riverbend and Carrollton neighborhoods, June 3, 2007.

City of New Orleans Recovery Plan: March 2007 IIn March, Blakely announced a new city recovery plan focused on 17 recovery areas. The plan (above) classifies the areas into three categories: rebuild (areas that were devastated by flooding); redevelop (neighborhoods that have modest resources in place); and renew (districts that are already more or less viable, but could use further help). Only two neighborhoods are rebuilds: the Lower Ninth Ward and New Orleans East Plaza.

CARROLLTON Carrollton qualifies as redevelop.

BROADMOOR Broadmoor qualifies as renew.

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