Glass is used not only to shape the building envelope but also to demarcate the spaces inside. This selection of architectural and façade glass incorporates graphic prints, organic materials, and high-performance finishes to bring texture, clear views, natural light, and plenty of glitz to suit the application at hand.

Crystal Collection, Carvart
Dazzling Swarovski crystals sandwiched between two glass lites turn this line of architectural glass for interior feature walls, partitions, and table tops into a dynamic installation. Offered in square, circle, triangle, and molecular shapes, the crystals can be arranged in patterns from sparse to concentrated and add a hint of sparkle or a full dose of glamour.

Credit: Carvart



Poured Glass, 3form
A liquid-lamination process encases organic materials such as seaweed and fabrics within a poured resin, giving 3form’s Poured Glass collection its 3D appearance. The resin is laminated between two glass lites, adding an eye-catching dimension to conventionally flat walls and partitions.

Credit: 3form



Alexander Girard Collection, Skyline Design
Skyline Design derived its Alexander Girard Collection from 10 graphic patterns that the late designer and former director of Herman Miller’s fabric division had conceived as textile patterns. Offered on transparent, translucent, and opaque glass, the prints are inspired by typography, the natural world, and repeated geometries.

Credit: Skyline Design



Optigray, PPG
PPG applies a gray tint to its Optigray clear façade glass, avoiding the green cast that other products may exhibit. For use with the company’s Solarban coatings, which are designed to limit solar heat gain while letting in more visible light, the glass aims to offer clearer views than similar products in the company’s offering, including Solargray (shown, right).

Credit: PPG



Hospitality Collection by Bart Halpern, Bendheim
Bendheim reimagined the metallic threads of designer Bart Halpern’s Glitterati textiles as architectural glass. Subtle from afar, the fabric reveals its intricacies up close by reflecting light to effuse a warm glow. Each of the five fabric interlayers offered can be laminated between low-iron glass lites. The glazing, which is intended for use in hospitality applications, can also be laminated to mirrors or back-painted.

Credit: Bendheim



Aura, Joel Berman Glass Studios
The whimsical pattern of Joel Berman Glass Studio’s Aura is digitally printed at three scales—small, medium, and large—with varied densities that let designers experiment with features such as statement walls and decorative partitions. Offered in tempered and laminated versions, the glass is suited for use in hospitality environments.

Credit: Joel Berman Glass Studios



Torque, Nathan Allan Glass Studio
Flat glass is molded with curves reminiscent of the collection’s mechanical namesake. Torque’s smooth surface features twisted ridges and valleys that obscure views of the space behind the glass to offer privacy while letting light through. The pattern can be viewed from both sides, suiting the temper-ready glass for use as interior partitions.

Credit: Nathan Allan Glass Studios



SunGuard Spandrel HT, Guardian
Guardian is growing its architectural glass portfolio with SunGuard Spandrel HT. The façade spandrel glass is heat treated with a proprietary coating to give it the performance characteristics of ceramic frit. For use in monolithic or insulated glazing applications, the glass features a smooth matte finish in white, gray, and black and can be paired with the company’s SunGuard high-performance glass coatings.

Credit: Guardian