Liability

 

Liability

  • Lawsuit Against USGBC Dismissed

    The U.S. District Court in New York City dismisses Henry Gifford's class action suit.

     
  • Absolutely Accessible

    Universal design is architecture's next great frontier.

     
  • The Building's Supposed to Be Green, But ...

    Legal battles over sustainability promises vs. performance are just beginning. But it's not only about design, it's also about contracts, expectations, and money.

     
  • Actionably Eco?: Liability Risks of Offering Green Design Services

    Arent Fox attorney Stephen Del Percio, LEED AP, breaks down some of the risks green-focused firms face in the nascent realm of sustainable building law.

     
  • Maharam and Eames Office Settle Copyright Infringement Suit

    Eames Office and Maharam have settled a lawsuit they filed last January against Swavelle/Mill Creek Fabrics and Easthill Hotel Corp. for copyright infringement and unfair competition arising from the use of the Dot Pattern in the Pod Hotel in New York.

     
  • 1st Circuit Appeals Court Salvages Boston Firm's Copyright Infringement Suit

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit overturned a lower court's ruling that had dismissed a Boston architecture firm's copyright infringement suit on the basis of timeliness. The lower court said Warren Freedenfeld Associates should have known it

     
  • Trailer Troubles

    The temporary housing provided to hurricane Katrina and Rita victims by FEMA is at the center of a lawsuit alleging excessive formaldehyde levels in the trailers and mobile homes.

     
  • AIA Releases 2007 Contract Documents

    Revisions to A201 may change architect's role

     
  • So, Gehry Got Sued ...

    Frank Gehry received a very public spanking in November when The Boston Globe revealed—on its front page, no less—that MIT was suing the architect for “providing deficient design services and drawings” for its $300 million Stata Center in Cambridge, Mass.

     
  • Too Close For Comfort

    A high-profile copyright infringement case shows how courts think about architecture.

     
 
 
 

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