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Table of Contents January 2010

 

Dialogue

  • Book Chat

    Editor-in-chief Ned Cramer shares a few favorite books from his personal library and asks readers to offer their own recommendations.

     

P/A Awards

Business

Best Practices

  • “There are usually 50 or 100 books on people’s desks at any given moment,” says Robert A.M. Stern of his firm’s collection of about 11,000 architectural tomes. “The library is the gateway to our architecture, conceptually. We do a lot of research—from both the aesthetic and technical points of view—in designing our buildings.”

    On the Bookshelf

    Why does Robert A.M. Stern keep a library of more than 11,000 volumes in his firm's offices? Because a smart staff needs intellectual stimulation.

     

Local Market

  • Project X Architect: Path Architecture, Portland. Completion: 2010. Brief: 78-space work/live business incubator recycled 95% of construction waste; on track for LEED Silver.

    Portland, Ore.

    Green architecture is practically the industry standard in Portland, where a mandate on sustainability pairs nicely with a strong can-do culture.

     

Strategy

  • Want the Medal? Keep the Metrics

    Revised rating system stays close to earlier versions, but rewards sustainable siting and requires post-occupancy performance data.

     

Technology

Detail

  • The brightly glazed Youth Center and Sports Complex in Saint-Cloud, France, is constructed from an articulated ribbon of stuctural, load-bearing, prefabricated concrete panels. This allowed for quick construction and was an experiment for Paris-based KOZ Architects, which had not previously worked with the material.

    Prefabricated Concrete Frame

    A new recreation center by Paris-based KOZ Architects relies on a prefabricated concrete frame for its structure and façade strategy.

     

Ecology

  • Gizmo Green

    Too often, green construction is about how smart a building's gadgets are. Instead, it should be about smart architecture.

     

Products

Other Articles

  • Green Toolbox

    Given the proliferation of free or inexpensive sustainable design tools on the Web, ARCHITECT asked three green leaders to tell us their go-to gadgets.

     

Culture

Crit

  • Visitors relax in Dallas’ new 10-acre Elaine D. and Charles A. Sammons Park, designed by French landscape architect Michel Desvigne. At right is the new opera house by Foster + Partners; its monumental canopy extends into, and provides shade for, the park.

    Enough Arts; More District

    Cathy Lang Ho wonders: Can Dallas turn a complex of starchitect-designed buildings into a vibrant urban district?

     

Exhibits Books Etc.

  • Its stunning iceberg of an opera house in Oslo made critics melt, but there’s more to the firm Snøhetta, which has been around since 1989.

    "SNØHETTA: architecture-landscapes-interiors," Scandinavia House

    "SNØHETTA: architecture-landscapes-interiors," at Scandinavia House in New York, features 11 of the firm's major projects via films, photographs, computer visualizations, drawings, and models.

     
  • Architecture monographs used to adhere to a three-part formula: professional photographs of recent buildings, project descriptions written by the firm’s marketing department, and an essay by a big-name friend of the principal. But ever since Bruce Mau and Rem Koolhaas published the iconoclastic S,M,L,XL in 1995, architects have been motivated to reinvent the monographic wheel. Höweler + Yoon Architecture’s new Expanded Practice, for instance, presents not a series of building projects but a series of research projects, which in the case of this technologically deft Boston firm amounts to much the same thing. $40; Princeton Architectural Press - Judging Eric Owen Moss’ Construction Manual: 1988–2008 by its cover (faux-leather binding, gold-embossed type, and tabbed section markers), one could mistake it for a dictionary or encyclopedia. The detail drawings inside, some of them Moss’ own sketches, prove he’s not just an architect-cum-theorist who designs insanely complex buildings, but one who cares deeply about how those buildings get built. $132.50; AADCU - As an exercise in sheer fun, the new monograph from New York architect Wendy Evans Joseph takes the prize. Sure, it’s got an essay by Paul Goldberger, but the real attractions are implicit in the book’s title: Pop Up Architecture. Paper engineer Kees Moerbeek pushed five of the architect’s projects, including a private observatory (pictured), into another new dimension. $75; Melcher Media

    Three New Books

    New books from Höweler + Yoon Architecture, Eric Owen Moss, and New York architect Wendy Evans Joseph.

     
  • Textile manufacturer Maharam has made big noise with upholstery fabrics by design superstars such as Hella Jongerius and Paul Smith.

    Photo Mural Wallcoverings, Maharam Digital Projects

    Textile manufacturer Maharam is expanding into wallcoverings with Maharam Digital Projects, a series of archival-quality photo murals by noted artists.

     
  • Architecture monographs used to adhere to a three-part formula: professional photographs of recent buildings, project descriptions written by the firm’s marketing department, and an essay by a big-name friend of the principal. But ever since Bruce Mau and Rem Koolhaas published the iconoclastic S,M,L,XL in 1995, architects have been motivated to reinvent the monographic wheel. Höweler + Yoon Architecture’s new Expanded Practice, for instance, presents not a series of building projects but a series of research projects, which in the case of this technologically deft Boston firm amounts to much the same thing. $40; Princeton Architectural Press - Judging Eric Owen Moss’ Construction Manual: 1988–2008 by its cover (faux-leather binding, gold-embossed type, and tabbed section markers), one could mistake it for a dictionary or encyclopedia. The detail drawings inside, some of them Moss’ own sketches, prove he’s not just an architect-cum-theorist who designs insanely complex buildings, but one who cares deeply about how those buildings get built. $132.50; AADCU - As an exercise in sheer fun, the new monograph from New York architect Wendy Evans Joseph takes the prize. Sure, it’s got an essay by Paul Goldberger, but the real attractions are implicit in the book’s title: Pop Up Architecture. Paper engineer Kees Moerbeek pushed five of the architect’s projects, including a private observatory (pictured), into another new dimension. $75; Melcher Media

    "Expanded Practice," Höwler + Yoon Architecture

    From Boston firm Höweler + Yoon Architecture comes "Expanded Practice," a book that includes a series of research projects.

     
  • Architecture monographs used to adhere to a three-part formula: professional photographs of recent buildings, project descriptions written by the firm’s marketing department, and an essay by a big-name friend of the principal. But ever since Bruce Mau and Rem Koolhaas published the iconoclastic S,M,L,XL in 1995, architects have been motivated to reinvent the monographic wheel. Höweler + Yoon Architecture’s new Expanded Practice, for instance, presents not a series of building projects but a series of research projects, which in the case of this technologically deft Boston firm amounts to much the same thing. $40; Princeton Architectural Press - Judging Eric Owen Moss’ Construction Manual: 1988–2008 by its cover (faux-leather binding, gold-embossed type, and tabbed section markers), one could mistake it for a dictionary or encyclopedia. The detail drawings inside, some of them Moss’ own sketches, prove he’s not just an architect-cum-theorist who designs insanely complex buildings, but one who cares deeply about how those buildings get built. $132.50; AADCU - As an exercise in sheer fun, the new monograph from New York architect Wendy Evans Joseph takes the prize. Sure, it’s got an essay by Paul Goldberger, but the real attractions are implicit in the book’s title: Pop Up Architecture. Paper engineer Kees Moerbeek pushed five of the architect’s projects, including a private observatory (pictured), into another new dimension. $75; Melcher Media

    "Construction Manual: 1988-2008," Eric Owen Moss

    The detail drawings and sketches in Eric Owen Moss' "Construction Manual: 1988-2008" prove Moss doesn't just design complex buildings, but also cares about how those buildings get built.

     
  • The Cooper-Hewitt’s National Design Awards has reached its milestone 10th year.

    "Design USA: Contemporary Innovation," Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum

    To celebrate the 10th year of its National Design Awards, the Cooper-Hewitt is staging "Design USA: Contemporary Innovation," a retrospective showcasing the work of more than 75 past winners.

     

Screen Grab

  • “I don’t think about our environmental impact and believe that we have to save the world,” says GreenKonnect founder Jameson Detweiler. “It’s just that the way we’ve been building is irresponsible. We need to do it in a different way.”

    greenkonnect.com

    LEED-focused construction can be a little bit like love: Sometimes, architects and building product makers need help connecting.

     

Past P/A

  • Utilitarian Landmark

    Winner of a 1961 P/A Award, the building's design—by Earl Carlin, with Peter Millard and Paul Pozzi—sparked a jury dispute over its place in the cityscape.