In this March 21, 2017 photo engineer Volkmar Dohmen stands in front of xenon short-arc lamps in the DLR German national aeronautics and space research center in Juelich, western Germany. The lights are part of an artificial sun that will be used for research purposes.  (Caroline Seidel/dpa via AP)
Courtesy Associated Press In this March 21, 2017 photo engineer Volkmar Dohmen stands in front of xenon short-arc lamps in the DLR German national aeronautics and space research center in Juelich, western Germany. The lights are part of an artificial sun that will be used for research purposes. (Caroline Seidel/dpa via AP)

Synlight, an "artificial sun" made up of 149 xenon short-arc lamped spotlights, was turned on for the first time in Juelich, Germany by scientists from the German Aerospace Centerm, in order to test how utilizing the energy of the actual sun would work for isolating hydrogen molecules. The giant globular fixture can heat up to 5,432 degrees Fahrenheit and is powered by a 350-kilowatt solar array. The aim is to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules, in order to produce hydrogen fuel.

Read the full story on the Associated Press.

Read more >