The market for interior finishes is filled with products meant to blend quietly into a space. But what does a designer specify for projects needing a bolder expression? This selection of wallcoverings provides a punch of pattern and color with the flexibility to be swapped out as tastes—or tenants—change.

Gradient by Thomas Eurlings, NLXL
Repeated geometry, recurring images of silhouettes and keys, and a colorful gradient define this wallpaper series by Dutch designer Thomas Eurlings for NLXL. By transitioning from dark hues to light ones, the paper has the effect of heightening the space while keeping the eye focused.

Trace, Trove
The silhouette of a forested landscape reflects onto itself in this wallpaper series from New York–based Trove. Trace is offered in five neutral colorways at 67”-wide-by-144”-tall repeats.


Great Hall, Dan Funderburgh for Flavor Paper
Designer Dan Funderburgh lets designers bring New York’s magnificent Metropolitan Museum of Art into their project with this wallpaper. Great Hall’s repeated columns are filled in with illustrations of the museum’s collection, including African masks, Tiffany lamps, Samurai armor, one of Georgia O’Keefe’s cow skulls, Jeff Koons’ balloon dogs, and a hippogriff.

Rorschach, Timorous Beasties for Clé
The five designs (splitter splatter damask, shown) in this hand-lithographed series are inspired by traditional damask motifs—with an imaginative kick. From the Glasgow, Scotland–based Timorous Beasties design studio, the 12”-square tiles use blotches, splats, drips, and abstracted florals to create a symmetrical, though unconventional, aesthetic.

The Hypnotist, Barbara Hulanicki for Graham & Brown
Add an optical illusion to spaces with a feature wall clad in U.K.-based designer Barbara Hulanicki’s Hypnotist wallpaper. Options range from high-contrast to subtle, with colorways in mono (shown), lime/ice, and noir. Rolls measure 33’ long and 22” wide.