Changing client tastes and short-lived fashions are enough to keep even the most intrepid interior statement pieces relatively neutral. This collection of standout fixtures and finishes departs from convention with the use of visual and material illusions in multiple dimensions.

Atlas, LaSelva
Valencia, Spain and Mexico City–based studio LaSelva’s Atlas encaustic cement tiles are covered in a continuous, maze-inspired pattern that matches up no matter which way the hexagonal units are oriented. The collection is offered in seven colorways (below).


LaSelva

Illusions, Marcel Wanders for Graham&Brown
Amsterdam-based designer Marcel Wanders’ new Illusions wallpaper for Graham&Brown features graphics that turn walls into a trompe-l’oeil. Among the line’s 24 variations, Braille Chester Noire (shown) uses a matrix of black dots, varying in size and density, on a white background to give the wall plane the illusion of depth and detail.

Graham&Brown


Graham&Brown

73, Bocci
Bocci, a lighting design studio based in Vancouver, recently debuted 73, a decorative LED pendant with a diffuser that gets its textile-like form from glass blown into a heat-resistant ceramic fabric casing. The force of the air pressure helps to give the diffuser its unique shape while the fabric relief leaves a tactile textural imprint. Previewed in January at Maison&Objet in Paris, the forthcoming pendant can be suspended solo or in a group installation.

Bocci


Bocci

Umami, Sofia Almqvist
Designer Sofia Almqvist of Swedish studio Kompaniet wants a return to the communal meal. Her Umami table is fitted with a carved ash top reminiscent of sand dunes or ocean waves. The piece is joined by a tableware collection, also designed by Almqvist, whose bases fit in the defining undulations, anchoring the meal—and its diners—to the table.

Kompaniet


Kompaniet

Kawara, Tsuyoshi Kawara
Sturdier than their European counterparts thanks to a higher firing temperature, Japanese clay roof tiles make suitable seats for the upcycled stools and benches of designer Tsuyoshi Hayashi. The salvaged tiles are trimmed to remove chips and cracked parts before they are mounted in a wood frame. Each tile can support up to 264 pounds.

Tsuyoshi Hayashi


Tsuyoshi Hayashi