Earlier this year, Cree added its proprietary SmartCast dimming to its CR Series LED architectural troffers.
Earlier this year, Cree added its proprietary SmartCast dimming to its CR Series LED architectural troffers.

This excerpt comes from our sister magazine Architectural Lighting.

Solid-state lighting’s electronic capabilities are helping luminaires take on new functions, from integrating wireless sensors to hosting video surveillance. Adding such software offers a valuable proposition, streamlining the equipment required for building systems while reducing the physical space needed for installation. But it also raises critical questions, such as how these light fixtures are sold—as hardware, software, or both—and the extent to which they are protected against tampering in the field or by remote access.

The first step is getting the product on the spec list, and manufacturers today need to sell to more than just the facilities management crew. “Where it used to be you just talked to one person and they decide who does all the lighting, you now have to find multiple touch points,” says Gary Harvey, senior product manager at Amerlux. “If you have the chief of police involved in this discussion or if you’re looking at a college campus and you have the dean of students and the head of security and a facilities manager, then it’s the right audience. It’s making sure you’re talking to the right people.” 

Commercial building managers are increasingly encouraged—if not required—to track the performance of their building systems. And the presence of security systems across corporate and college campuses, as well as downtowns, is ever more common. Integrating new software in the form of multiple sensing components and audio and video surveillance in the hardware of an LED luminaire is a valuable proposition: It simplifies the equipment and lowers its cost, while reducing the physical space occupied with space for mechanical systems at a premium.

You can read the rest of the article at Architectural Lighting.