Launch Slideshow

More images of the three entries are available in our Project Gallery

More images of the three entries are available in our Project Gallery

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    WXY architecture + urban design

    More images of the WXY Next 100 entry can be found in our Project Gallery.

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    © SOM

    More images of the Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Next 100 entry can be found in our Project Gallery.

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    Foster + Partners

    More images of the Foster + Partners Next 100 entry can be found in our Project Gallery.

The Municipal Art Society of New York presented three visions of Grand Central Terminal at its October Summit for New York City, in a program entitled The Next 100. These proposals, submitted by Foster + Partners; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill; and WXY Architecture + Urban Design, attempt to look into the future uses of the venerable rail terminal. All three focus attention on pedestrian uses, with SOM’s vision including a moving observation deck above the existing historic terminal building. WXY’s scheme highlights connections to the neighborhoods surrounding Grand Central Terminal, while that of Foster + Partners reconfigures the urban fabric around the station to accommodate new pedestrian and traffic patterns.

In a press release for the event, Claire Weisz, AIA, principal at WXY, said, "The plan for Midtown’s near future needs to make the Grand Central neighborhood a place people enjoy being in, not just running through.”


This article has been updated: Grand Central Terminal is the correct name of the train station in New York; Grand Central Station refers to the post office branch. We regret the error.