Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Markus Tretter/Courtesy Simon Fujiwara and Kunsthaus Bregenz Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"

The story of Anne Frank, a young Jewish girl who went into hiding with her family during the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands in World War II, is near-universally known. Her diary, which she kept while hiding in a secret annex at Prinsengracht 263 in Amsterdam, gives detailed insights into her family's two-year-long struggle to remain hidden, before being tragically caught and sent to concentration camps. Today, the building is known as the Anne Frank House, and was officially established as a museum in 1960. Now, a new exhibition by British artist Simon Fujiwara, titled "Hope House," features a full-scale replica of the family's temporary sanctuary split across three floors of the Kunsthau Bregenz museum in Austria.

Portrait of Simon Fujiwara in his exhibition at the Kunsthaus Bregenz.
Miro Kuzmanovic/Courtesy Kunsthaus Bregenz Portrait of Simon Fujiwara in his exhibition at the Kunsthaus Bregenz.
A small-scale model kit of the Anne Frank House
Simon Fujiwara A small-scale model kit of the Anne Frank House

The show displays select personal items from Frank's family juxtaposed with a larger selection of contemporary objects that aim to criticize consumerist culture. One portion of the space, titled "Anne Frank’s Bedroom Wall" (2017), is inspired by the images Anne had collected of celebrities, royal family, art, and nature. It includes a selection of posters and images of the famous figures who have visited the real Anne Frank House, including the 67th U.S. Secretary of State and former senator and First Lady Hillary Clinton; CEO of Apple, Tim Cook; and singers Beyoncé Knowles and Justin Bieber. "What Beyoncé wore to the Anne Frank House" (2017), features a hand-made recreation of the fray trouser suit, worn by Beyoncé when visiting the Anne Frank House in 2014.

Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Markus Tretter/Courtesy Simon Fujiwara and Kunsthaus Bregenz Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Markus Tretter/Courtesy Simon Fujiwara and Kunsthaus Bregenz Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Markus Tretter/Courtesy Simon Fujiwara and Kunsthaus Bregenz Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Markus Tretter/Courtesy Simon Fujiwara and Kunsthaus Bregenz Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"

This contrast between historic and contemporary items in "Hope House" seeks to challenge visitors' understanding of complex notions of reality, history, and authenticity. "The walls are hung with artworks and the rooms filled with objects and artifacts from everyday life—a desk, a diary and pen, a bedroom wall plastered with posters." said a museum press release. "In the attic, cat food is scattered across the wooden floor but there is no cat and nobody seems to live there anymore."

Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"
Markus Tretter/Courtesy Simon Fujiwara and Kunsthaus Bregenz Simon Fujiwara "Hope House"

The installation is based on a small-scale model kit of the house, which Fujiwara purchased from the Anne Frank Museum's gift shop in Amsterdam. "Hope House does not attempt to present itself as a real architectural experience, and certainly not the Anne Frank House experience," according to the same release. "It is the copy of a copy based on a product sold on the free market, and it makes no pretense of this."

"Hope House" runs through Apr. 2 at the Kunsthau Bregenz museum.