The five winners of this year's Aga Khan Award for Architecture awards were announced last week. Founded in 1977, the awards are given out every three years to projects that exemplify community-building in locales with large Muslim constituencies.

This year's projects span continents (Africa, Asia, and Europe) and function. The winning projects are:

An Islamic cemetery in Altach, Austria by Bernardo Bader Architects (Dombirn, Austria). Completed in 2011, the cemetery serves the state of Vorarlberg, where eight percent of the population is Muslim, and allows these people to be buried in Austria with Muslim burial rituals.

Islamic cemetery, by Bernardo Bader Architects. Congregation space. Altach, Austria.

Islamic cemetery, by Bernardo Bader Architects. Congregation space. Altach, Austria.

Credit: Adolf Bereuter


Islamic cemetery, by Bernardo Bader Architects. Entrance elevation. Altach, Austria.

Islamic cemetery, by Bernardo Bader Architects. Entrance elevation. Altach, Austria.

Credit: Adolf Bereuter


Two of the winning projects are located in northern Africa. The 63-bed Salam Centre for Cardiac Surgery (Studio Tamassociati of Venice, Italy) is located in Khartoum, Sudan. The center also features housing for hospital staff built from containers used to move construction materials. 

Salam Center for Cardiac Surgery, by Studio Tamassociati. Small courtyard. Khartoum, Sudan.

Salam Center for Cardiac Surgery, by Studio Tamassociati. Small courtyard. Khartoum, Sudan.

Credit: Raul Pantaleo


Salam Center for Cardiac Surgery, by Studio Tamassociati. Cafeteria terrace. Khartoum, Sudan.

Salam Center for Cardiac Surgery, by Studio Tamassociati. Cafeteria terrace. Khartoum, Sudan.

Credit: Raul Pantaleo


The continent's second winning project is in Rabat, Morocco. Marc Mimram Architecture (Paris, France) was the architect of the 2011 Rabat-Salé Urban Infrastructure Project, consisting of the Hassan II Bridge and related infrastructure, which links Rabat and Salé.

Hassan II Bridge, by Marc Mimram Architecture. General view of the bridge. Rabat and Salé, Morocco.

Hassan II Bridge, by Marc Mimram Architecture. General view of the bridge. Rabat and Salé, Morocco.

Credit: Marc Mimram


The remaining winning projects are located in Asia. ICHTO East Azerbaijan Office (Tabriz, Iran) has been working to renovate and update Iran's Tabriz Historic Bazaar Complex.

The Tabriz Bazaar renovation, by ICHTQ East Azerbaijan Office. Carpet market. Tabriz, Iran.

The Tabriz Bazaar renovation, by ICHTQ East Azerbaijan Office. Carpet market. Tabriz, Iran.

Credit: Amir Anoushfar


The Tabriz Bazaar renovation, by ICHTQ East Azerbaijan Office. Detail of brick vaults. Tabriz, Iran.

The Tabriz Bazaar renovation, by ICHTQ East Azerbaijan Office. Detail of brick vaults. Tabriz, Iran.

Credit: Amir Anoushfar


In Palestine, the Riwaq Centre for Architectural Conservation (Ramallah, Palestine) is working to revitalize the Birzeit Historic Centre.

Birzeit historic center revitalization, by Riwaq. Birzeit University guest house after renovation. Birzeit, Palestine.

Birzeit historic center revitalization, by Riwaq. Birzeit University guest house after renovation. Birzeit, Palestine.

Credit: Riwaq


Birzeit historic center revitalization, by Riwaq. Birzeit Municipality guest house, before and after. Birzeit, Palestine.

Birzeit historic center revitalization, by Riwaq. Birzeit Municipality guest house, before and after. Birzeit, Palestine.

Credit: Riwaq


Spread across the five winning projects, the contest carries a one million dollar prize, although the Master Jury of the contest can award that money to any party involved in the project, such as the locale or client.