Frank Lloyd Wright, 'Sixty Years of Living Architecture' exhibition building (demolished), New York perspective (presentation drawing), 1953, Graphite and ink on tracing paper.

Frank Lloyd Wright, 'Sixty Years of Living Architecture' exhibition building (demolished), New York perspective (presentation drawing), 1953, Graphite and ink on tracing paper.

Credit: © 1988 Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona

Despite the fame Frank Lloyd Wright enjoyed throughout his career, it wasn’t until close to the end of his life that his work was recognized in one of the U.S.’s grandest cities: New York. The Solomon R. Guggenheim museum, arguably one of Wright’s most famous works, opened its doors to crowds in 1959, but it was a few years prior, in 1953, when Wright first received the public acclaim he craved. In October, the exhibition 'Sixty Years of Living Architecture: The Work of Frank Lloyd Wright' opened on the site of the future Guggenheim. An apt 60 years later, in July 2012, A Long-Awaited Tribute: Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian House and Pavilion opened at the Guggenheim, highlighting Wright’s proposed style for middle-class houses and the pavilion that housed his first retrospective in New York City all those years ago. • guggenheim.org