The AIA 2014 Convention in Chicago is one week away and campaigns for the three national AIA offices are heating up. The 2015–2016 candidates for vice president are: Bill Bates, AIA; Frank Pitts, FAIA; and Ed Vance, FAIA. 


Meet the Candidates  
(responses in their own words)

Bill Bates, AIA; AIA Pittsburgh

Credit: Stephen Voss


Background

I served at the local level through various committees and on the board, and as president of the Pittsburgh chapter where I'm from. Then I moved on from there to the state level where I served as president on that board twice over a number of years. Then I served on some national committees. Now I'm serving on the national board.

Role Models

There's an architect named David Lewis [FAIA] in Pittsburgh who has had a profound impact on my career. He has done some wonderful things. He's an organizer of an international conference that we held in our chapter. He set a trend of focusing on and revitalizing Rust Belt cities and set the example of what architecture and good planning can do for a city and region, how it can change lives. He’s one of my role models, along with other locals.


Frank Pitts, FAIA; AIA Eastern New York

Credit: Stephen Voss


Background

I've been an architect in independent practice at a small firm for 35 years and have run my own firm for 30 years. I've been in AIA leadership for 30 years at the local, state, and national levels. I've served on the national board and also ran one of the knowledge communities, the Academy of Architecture for Health. So I've been all the way around the AIA surfacely. … I really think that the private practice and involvement with young architects and female architects in my own practice makes me ready to try to change the nature of our profession so that it really works for the next generation a little better than it worked for us.

Role Models

The two that most readily come to mind are Gold medalist Peter Bohlin [FAIA] who I did a couple projects with when I was a student; Peter's an amazing designer and he has one of the best teaching practices in America. In terms of thinking about my own practice and design, I think about Peter. In terms of my personal life and in terms of leadership style, I think of Frances Bronet, who was a neighbor of mine in Troy [N.Y.] who went on to be the dean of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts at the University of Oregon. She collaborates across disciplines and makes beautiful things in those collaborations, but she builds relationships that actually make herself a more effective leader.


Ed Vance, FAIA; AIA Las Vegas

Credit: Stephen Voss


Background

I've been a member [of AIA] since 1990. I've run through all the leadership positions: local, state, regional, and national. ... I was the one who introduced the inverted pyramid, which was grasped by our repositioning partner. I like the simple notion that the national supports the regional that supports state and local chapters. Our members are on top—they're who we serve. ... I really believe in the local chapters, because they deliver the programs to our members, including everything from product shows to golf tournaments that generate revenue to mentorship programs and architect forums. It's all happening there.

Role Models

I am influenced by my CACE representatives across the country. When it comes to this Institute, they're the ones that are coming up with new ideas from a grassroots standpoint about how to make the Institute a better place for our members. They refer to us as their architects. They have such ownership, it's incredible. Who wouldn't want that? … They keep the lights on and the wheels turning.


Meet the two candidates running for the office of secretary.

Check out what all eight candidates running for the top three AIA positions said about their goals for office and what they think the Institute can provide for current and future members

Look out for more AIA candidate Q&As in ARCHITECT's Countdown to Convention.