Launch Slideshow

Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari - Modena - Marzo 2012

Enzo Ferrari Museum

Enzo Ferrari Museum

  • The vivid yellow shell of the new Enzo Ferrari Museum is made from 5,000 extruded aluminum pieces, fitted together with tongue-and-groove joinery by shipbuildersthe same way one would assemble the hull of a ship. The shell is pierced by 10 fins to create computer-controlled skylights that vent warm air during the day.

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    The vivid yellow shell of the new Enzo Ferrari Museum is made from 5,000 extruded aluminum pieces, fitted together with tongue-and-groove joinery by shipbuildersthe same way one would assemble the hull of a ship. The shell is pierced by 10 fins to create computer-controlled skylights that vent warm air during the day.

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    Studio Cento29

    The vivid yellow shell of the new Enzo Ferrari Museum is made from 5,000 extruded aluminum pieces, fitted together with tongue-and-groove joinery by shipbuilders—the same way one would assemble the hull of a ship. The shell is pierced by 10 fins to create computer-controlled skylights that vent warm air during the day.

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    Studio Cento29

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

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    David Pasek

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

  • Café tables sit along the curving glazed curtainwall.

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    Café tables sit along the curving glazed curtainwall.

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    Andrea Morgante

    Café tables sit along the curving glazed curtainwall.

  • Forked columns meet the roof at the glazed eastern end of the building

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    Forked columns meet the roof at the glazed eastern end of the building

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    Andrea Morgante

    Forked columns meet the roof at the glazed eastern end of the building

  • The yellow of the building exterior reappears inside on the volumes that enclose ticketing and restrooms.

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    The yellow of the building exterior reappears inside on the volumes that enclose ticketing and restrooms.

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    Studio Cento29

    The yellow of the building exterior reappears inside on the volumes that enclose ticketing and restrooms.

  • Inside, the ceiling plane is far less brightly hued that the vivid exterior: White PVC fabric is stretched taut over web trusses, akin to the ceiling of a car.

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    Inside, the ceiling plane is far less brightly hued that the vivid exterior: White PVC fabric is stretched taut over web trusses, akin to the ceiling of a car.

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    Andrea Morgante

    Inside, the ceiling plane is far less brightly hued that the vivid exterior: White PVC fabric is stretched taut over web trusses, akin to the ceiling of a car.

  • The exhibit floor slopes down more than 16 feet, and specially designed stands elevate the cars 1.6 feet above the ground.

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    The exhibit floor slopes down more than 16 feet, and specially designed stands elevate the cars 1.6 feet above the ground.

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    Andrea Morgante

    The exhibit floor slopes down more than 16 feet, and specially designed stands elevate the cars 1.6 feet above the ground.

  • Cars showcased in the exhibition area.

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    Cars showcased in the exhibition area.

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    Studio Cento29

    Cars showcased in the exhibition area.

  • Each car sits on a custom-designed podium, allowing it to hover over the ground plane.

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    Each car sits on a custom-designed podium, allowing it to hover over the ground plane.

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    Andrea Morgante

    Each car sits on a custom-designed podium, allowing it to hover over the ground plane.

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

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    Courtesy Shiro Studio

  • Inside the Ferrari House next door to the new Future Systems building is a double-height exhibit space designed by one of the firms former associates, Andrea Morgante of Shiro Studio.

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    Inside the Ferrari House next door to the new Future Systems building is a double-height exhibit space designed by one of the firms former associates, Andrea Morgante of Shiro Studio.

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    Inside the Ferrari House next door to the new Future Systems building is a double-height exhibit space designed by one of the firm’s former associates, Andrea Morgante of Shiro Studio.

  • A finned structure houses projectors for multimedia displays.

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    A finned structure houses projectors for multimedia displays.

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    Studio Cento29

    A finned structure houses projectors for multimedia displays.

  • The fins incorporate photographs of Ferrari, as well as relics such as notebooks and vintage brochures.

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    The fins incorporate photographs of Ferrari, as well as relics such as notebooks and vintage brochures.

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    Studio Cento29

    The fins incorporate photographs of Ferrari, as well as relics such as notebooks and vintage brochures.

The impressive span of the Ferrari Museum’s roof shelters a single basilicalike room with a few subordinate pods. Like the crystalline façade, all of the elements, such as the enclosure for the bar and giftshop, and that for the toilets, follow aerodynamic curves. The room slopes 5 meters (16.4 feet) from front to rear, allowing the visitor to descend a gently sloping floor that continues to a lower level within a tear-shaped cut through the ground-level floor. A small theater and a conference hall occupy the areas on this basement level directly beneath the entrance. The constant slope helps to offset the podia for the 19 automobiles on display (the exhibition will be changed periodically with loans from private collections). Each car has been set on a rectangular plate balanced on a half-meter-high drum so that they do not appear to be parked but indeed resemble sculptures.

Aside from the passive thermal advantage of sinking the building into the ground, the Ferrari Museum became the first in Italy to exploit geothermal energy for heating and cooling, with 24 wells drilled 130 meters (426.5 feet) into the earth. A cylindrical structure that houses the technical equipment is set in the parking lot and carries solar panels for hot water. The institution also uses off-site photovoltaics as an additional alternative energy source and in all has reduced its energy costs by 50 percent over a comparably sized building with conventional systems.

Andrea Morgante, who faithfully completed Kaplický’s design of the new building according to the latter’s drawings, took personal responsibility for the display area in the historic buildings. Here, he inserted majestic X-shaped steel braces on slender spider-leg poles beneath the timber beams of the shed for seismic protection (recently put to the test with the region’s earthquakes in early May). He divided the long room with a narrow technical chamber for multi-image projectors and hung off of it dozens of differently curved flanges, supposedly suggesting the pages of the biography of Enzo Ferrari, although they seem more like the rhythmic legs of a giant centipede. While consistent with the organic impulses of his precursor, these forms seem more for effect than as the integral effects of technology. The carefully crafted new museum, like Ferrari’s products, enhances the reputation of Modena, its famous carmaker, and the designers, occupying a class of its own.


Project Credits

Location Modena, Italy
Client Fondazione Casa Natale Enzo Ferrari
Architect Future Systems—Jan Kaplický
Project Architect Shiro Studio, London—Andrea Morgante
Competition Team Jan Kaplický, Andrea Morgante, Liz Middleton, Federico Celoni
Project Team Andrea Morgante, Søren Aagaard, Oriana Cremella, Chris Geneste, Cristina Greco, Clancy Meyers, Liz Middleton, Itai Palti, Filippo Previtali, Daria Trovato (Preliminary, Detailed, Construction, 2005–2007)
Art Direction Andrea Morgante (2009–2012)
Exhibition Design Jan Kaplický, Andrea Morgante (gallery); Andrea Morgante (Enzo Ferrari House)
Structural/Environmental Services Arup (competition)
Project Management and Site Supervision Politecnica—Francesca Federzoni (disciplines integration); Fabio Camorani (structures and site supervision); Francesco Frassineti (electrical); Paolo Muratori (building site supervision); Stefano Simonini (health and safety)
Structural/Mechanical/Electrical Design, Environmental Impact Assessement, Health & Safety Politecnica (preliminary, detailed, and construction stages)
Quantity Surveying Politecnica (design and construction)
Contractor Società Consortile Enzo; CCC soc. coop. (Leader), Ing. Ferrari, ITE Group, CSM.; Giuseppe Coppi (technical director, CdC—Modena)
Size 5,200 square meters (55,972 gross square feet)
Contract Value €14.2 million ($17.6 million)