Nick Zukauskas

In this edition of the Progressive Questionnaire, Sports co-founders Greg Corso and Molly Hunker share the ideas behind their projects, with the memorable names.

Firm: Sports
Location: Syracuse, N.Y.
Year founded: 2010
Leadership: Greg Corso and Molly Hunker (co-captains)
Education: Corso: B.A. and M.Arch., University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); Hunker: B.A., Dartmouth University; M.Arch., UCLA
Experience: Corso: Studio Gang, Standard Architecture, Cliff Garten Studio; Hunker: Doug Aitken Workshop, Talbot McLanahan Architecture
How founders met: Graduate school
Staff size: 2 employees

Mission:
Sports strives to make compelling spaces and objects that embrace the ideas latent in everyday phenomena. We are a small studio whose approach to architecture is simple: Balance rigor and research with amusement and curiosity.

Design tool of choice:
Sketches and fun materials.

First commission:
“Life Will Kill You,” an installation for the Revolve Clothing showroom (now closed) in West Hollywood, Calif.

For the Revolve clothing showroom in West Hollywood, Calif., Sports crafted “Life Will Kill You,” a cloud-like volume from electrical lamp cord and more than 100,000 zip ties to contrast with the boutique’s high-end clothing.
Justin Harris For the Revolve clothing showroom in West Hollywood, Calif., Sports crafted “Life Will Kill You,” a cloud-like volume from electrical lamp cord and more than 100,000 zip ties to contrast with the boutique’s high-end clothing.
Justin Harris


Favorite project:
“Rounds,” our winning entry for this year’s Ragdale Ring competition, is our favorite because we built it with a great team of folks in a beautiful location (on the former estate of Howard Van Doren Shaw in Lake Forest, Ill.) for a terrific organization. We are also not exactly sure why we like it so much, which is why we like it so much.

Sports’ mint-green, plywood-and-rubberized-stucco “Rounds,” on the grounds of the Ragdale Foundation, serves as everything from performance space to seating.
Nick Zukauskas Sports’ mint-green, plywood-and-rubberized-stucco “Rounds,” on the grounds of the Ragdale Foundation, serves as everything from performance space to seating.
Nick Zukauskas

Second favorite project:
“Stay Down, Champion, Stay Down” was the first competition we won. It was a great opportunity to synthesize a handful of ideas that were floating around our heads at the time into a built product. The project was located in the heart of Hollywood, providing endless interactions with interesting characters.

"Stay Down, Champion, Stay Down"
Justin Harris "Stay Down, Champion, Stay Down"

Modern-day design hero:
We have many; most are not architects. In architecture, we look up to offices like SANAA and Herzog & de Meuron for the way they do a lot with a little.

Special item in your studio space: A pair of adorable cats.

“Myth,” installed in Chicago, re-imagines the ornate and often kitsch assembly of home shrines with suspended handmade candles that regress from a clean finish at the top to a rusticated, morphing look toward the bottom.
Wallo Villacorta “Myth,” installed in Chicago, re-imagines the ornate and often kitsch assembly of home shrines with suspended handmade candles that regress from a clean finish at the top to a rusticated, morphing look toward the bottom.
Wallo Villacorta


Memorable learning experience:
Before we started working together, we both worked separately in the art world, which helped broaden our points of reference as architects.

Skills to master: Remembering it’s just architecture.

Morning person or night owl?
Half of us are morning people, half are night people. (Hunker is the former, Corso, the latter.)

“Runaway” is Sports’ winning entry for a public art pavilion that will host the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara’s 2017 “Takepart | Makeart” initiative.
courtesy SPORTS “Runaway” is Sports’ winning entry for a public art pavilion that will host the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara’s 2017 “Takepart | Makeart” initiative.
courtesy SPORTS

When we’re not working in architecture …
We are “researching”—also known as watching television.

Superstition: Always assume we will lose the competition.

Vice: Naps.

The tangible qualities of candy—gumminess, color, softness, and translucency—inspired “The Sweetness,” Sports’ entry for the 2014 Louisville Children’s Museum Competition.
Courtesy SPORTS The tangible qualities of candy—gumminess, color, softness, and translucency—inspired “The Sweetness,” Sports’ entry for the 2014 Louisville Children’s Museum Competition.

Social media platform of choice:
Printing images and showing them to people in person. We are a little behind the times.