Michelle Jaja Chang, a mock-up of drywall construction according to the implementation of specific material guidelines and their translation into a score, Boston, 2019. From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to Materials & Applications for the exhibition "Staging Construction"
Courtesy Graham Foundation From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to Materials & Applications for the exhibition "Staging Construction"

Each year, the Chicago-based Graham Foundation selects a number of organizations from around the world to receive grants that support arts and architecture projects. This year, the foundation has announced $580,000 to fund projects that "tackle urgent contemporary questions, illuminate historic work with new perspective, promote experimental research, and support critical conversations in and around architecture," according to a Graham Foundation press release.

The 2019 organization grant recipients fund 54 different projects, ranging from Junya Ishigami's 2019 Serpentine Pavilion in London to a Detroit- and Ann Arbor–based symposium on affordable and inclusive housing. The 2019 grantees will join the network of more than 4,600 previous recipients from the past 63 years.

A selection of the grantees can be found below, and a full list of this year's recipients can be found of the Graham Foundation website.

Lee Bey, Pride Cleaners, 558 East Seventy-Ninth Street, Chicago, IL, 2019. From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to Northwestern University Press for the publication "Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago's South Side"
Courtesy Lee Bey Lee Bey, Pride Cleaners, 558 East Seventy-Ninth Street, Chicago, IL, 2019

Project: Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago's South Side, by Lee Bey
Grantee: Northwestern University Press, Evanston, Ill.
Graham Foundation project description:Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago's South Side, by Lee Bey, is the first book devoted to the South Side's rich vein of architecture and urban design. Through lively text and gallery-worthy photography, Southern Exposure spotlights more than 60 architecturally significant sites across an area of Chicago that has faced intense disinvestment. The book features works by luminaries such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Daniel Burnham, Eero Saarinen, and Frederick Law Olmsted—designs largely unseen because of their marginalized geography. Other architects profiled, such as W.T. Bailey, John Moutoussamy, and the firm Ryder Morrison & Margerum, are black designers doubly ignored because of their buildings’ locations and outright racism. Dozens of other vernacular designs are largely absent from Chicago’s dominant branding as an architectural city, from the spectacular Space-Age dry cleaners on 79th Street, to more than a mile of historic greystones on Martin Luther King Drive in the Bronzeville neighborhood.

Heinz Emigholz, still from "Goff in the Desert" ("Goff in der Wüste"), 2002–03. From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to Haus der Kulturen der Welt for the publication "Counter Gravity: The Architecture Films of Heinz Emigholz"
Copyright Heinz Emigholz and Filmgalerie 451 Heinz Emigholz, still from "Goff in the Desert" ("Goff in der Wüste"), 2002–03

Project: Counter Gravity: The Architecture Films of Heinz Emigholz
Grantee: Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin
Graham Foundation project description: Haus der Kulturen der Welt is publishing the first comprehensive monograph on the complete works of the filmmaker, visual artist, and author Heinz Emigholz. Since the 1970s, Emigholz has used a unique cinematic formal language to explore the relationship between film time and spatial experience, remembrance structure, and consciousness. His work radically departs from conventional representations of space and architecture in film, making him a pioneer of experimental architectural film. Emigholz focuses on often lesser-known, visionary buildings by Samuel Bickels, Eladio Dieste, Bruce Goff, Adolf Loos, Pier Luigi Nervi, Rudolph Schindler, among others. The extensive, richly-illustrated publication will be the first to broadly classify Emigholz’s complete work within architectural criticism, art, and film studies. Several authors, including Hartmut Bitomsky, Gertrud Koch, Dennis Lim, Ines Weizman, contribute a thorough examination of the complex work.

"Countryside, The Future," a collaboration between the Guggenheim and AMO / Rem Koolhaas, examines radical changes transforming the nonurban landscape and culminates in an exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, opening February 20, 2020. From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum for the publication "Countryside, The Future"
Pieternel van Velden (Koppert Cress, The Netherlands 2011) "Countryside, The Future," a collaboration between the Guggenheim and AMO / Rem Koolhaas, opening February 20, 2020

Project: Countryside, The Future
Grantee: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Graham Foundation project description: For the past forty years, architect Rem Koolhaas, Hon. FAIA, has been a pioneer investigating the contemporary city. Countryside, The Future marks a shift in Koolhaas’s career-long urban focus to what he considers the new edge of the future: the vast, non-urban, rural, deserted, and wild territories he collectively calls countryside. Developed through his architectural think tank, AMO, this exhibition presents speculations about tomorrow through insights found in the countryside of today. Expanding upon the exhibition’s themes, the Countryside, The Future catalogue explores topics including artificial intelligence and automation, climate change, the effects of genetic experimentation, political radicalization and migration, large-scale territorial management, human-animal ecosystems, the impact of the digital on the physical, and other impending mutations of everyday life through global case studies.

Shoreline Apartments, view towards Buffalo City Hall, ca. 1970s. From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to El Museo Francisco Oller y Diego Rivera for the exhibition "Paul Rudolph's Shoreline Apartments"
Courtesy Library of Congress Shoreline Apartments, view towards Buffalo City Hall, ca. 1970s. From the 2019 Graham Foundation Organizational Grant to El Museo Francisco Oller y Diego Rivera for the exhibition "Paul Rudolph's Shoreline Apartments"

Project: Paul Rudolph's Shoreline Apartments
Grantee: El Museo Francisco Oller y Diego Rivera, Buffalo, N.Y.
Graham Foundation project description: Located steps from City Hall in Buffalo’s Lower West Side, Shoreline Apartments was a public housing complex designed by architect Paul Rudolph and completed in 1974. Today, the brutalist structures are among the most hated buildings in the city, and are being demolished and replaced with new, Victorian-style townhouses. This project documents a history of the complex from its planning to eventual demise, using it as a lens to explore the legacy of modernism and public housing in Buffalo. The project also collects the untold stories of the buildings’ inhabitants, and poses critical questions about equity in architecture and historic preservation: Whose buildings are important? Whose stories get told?

Upcoming deadlines for the next round of Graham Foundation grant applications are: Grants to individuals (Sept. 15) and the Carter Manny Award (Nov. 15).