The Milam Residence was completed in 1962 with four bedrooms and four bathrooms.
Photo by Robert Champion, courtesy of the Archives of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation The Milam Residence was completed in 1962 with four bedrooms and four bathrooms.

Rising almost 30 feet above the Atlantic Ocean, the Milam Residence serves as a late-Modernist landmark on the shore of Ponte Vedra Beach in St. Johns County, Fl. With a distinct façade of three-dimensional squares and rectangles, the house serves as an example of architect Paul Rudolph's geometric style and sensitivity to the surrounding environment. Since its initial listing in 2017 for $4.7 million, the Milam Residence has returned to the market for $4.4 million following a site restoration.

Photo by Robert Champion, courtesy of the Archives of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

Rudolph built the 6,858-square-foot Milam Residence for attorney Arthur W. Milam on 2.1 acres of beachfront land in 1962, positioning the house just 200 feet from the ocean shoreline. Made of poured concreted and concrete blocks, the residence features large windows offering views of the ocean, capitalizing on the area’s natural light. In addition to four bedrooms and four bathrooms, the house features a large kitchen and multiple open spaces for entertaining. After Milam married in 1969, Rudolph returned and designed a one-bedroom, one-bathroom guesthouse, a three-car garage, and a large pool to accommodate Milam’s growing family.

Joseph W. Molitor architectural photographs. Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, courtesy of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation
Joseph W. Molitor architectural photographs. Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, courtesy of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

“A composition of considerable spatial variety with vertical and horizontal interpenetration of spaces clearly defined inside and out." Rudolph said of the Milam Residence in 1970. "Gone are the earlier notions of organization through regular structure with subdivisions of space freely spaced. Spatial organization has taken the place of purely structural organization. Floors and walls are extended in elaborated forms toward the views, thereby making of the facade a reflection of the interior space. The brises-soleil also serve as mullions for the glass, turning the exterior wall into a series of deep openings filled only with glass. The exceptional wild Florida site 60 feet above the Atlantic Ocean is a counterfoil to the geometry of the structure.”

Photo by Robert Champion, courtesy of the Archives of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

The Milam family has remained the owner and resident of the house since its completion, seeing it onto the National Register of Historic Places in 2016. The Milam Residence was the last Florida house Rudolph completed before beginning his residency at Yale in 1957. The project was also Rudolph’s first to incorporate air-conditioning combating the area’s oppressive summer heat.

Photo by Robert Champion, courtesy of the Archives of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation
Photo by Robert Champion, courtesy of the Archives of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

After receiving a Masters of Architecture from Harvard in 1946 and opening his own firm in 1952, Rudolph rose to global prominence in 1954 when he won the Outstanding Young Architects Award at the São Paulo International Competition. In 1957, he became chairman, and later dean, of the School of Architecture at Yale University. Famous for his sculptural designs, Rudolph worked until his death in 1997.

Joseph W. Molitor architectural photographs. Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, courtesy of the Paul Rudolph Heritage Foundation

The Milam Residence is listed by Clare Berry at Berry & Co. Real Estate.