On Wednesday, President Obama said the United States will soon reopen an embassy in Havana, the capital of Cuba, as part of changing diplomatic relations with the country. Here is a look back in time at former embassies in Havana.

The U.S. Embassy in Havana can be seen in this April 24, 1942, photograph, with its garden in the foreground, which had been built on the outskirts of the city on a hill overlooking the sea. The two-story stone mansion, which was occupied by American ambassador to Cuba Spruille Braden, was constructed at a cost of $300,000. It had eight master bedrooms, seven master baths, four dressing rooms, a great reception, living and dining rooms, three kitchens and service pantries, porches, terraces, and servants quarters.
La Prensa/Associated Press The U.S. Embassy in Havana can be seen in this April 24, 1942, photograph, with its garden in the foreground, which had been built on the outskirts of the city on a hill overlooking the sea. The two-story stone mansion, which was occupied by American ambassador to Cuba Spruille Braden, was constructed at a cost of $300,000. It had eight master bedrooms, seven master baths, four dressing rooms, a great reception, living and dining rooms, three kitchens and service pantries, porches, terraces, and servants quarters.

The U.S. embassy building on Obisbo Street in Havana on Feb. 15, 1946.
Charles Kenneth Lucas/Associated Press The U.S. embassy building on Obisbo Street in Havana on Feb. 15, 1946.

In 1953, the United States opened an embassy building in Havana that had been designed by New York's Harrison & Abramovitz. The embassy closed in 1961.

After Fidel Castro ordered that the U.S. embassy reduce its staff to 12 officials within 48 hours, scores of Cuban nationals flocked to the American diplomatic headquarters in hopes of obtaining a visa. The visa section was closed, as the embassy made preparations to cut its staff on Jan. 3, 1961. What you can see in the photo is but a small portion of the crowd around the embassy.
Associated Press After Fidel Castro ordered that the U.S. embassy reduce its staff to 12 officials within 48 hours, scores of Cuban nationals flocked to the American diplomatic headquarters in hopes of obtaining a visa. The visa section was closed, as the embassy made preparations to cut its staff on Jan. 3, 1961. What you can see in the photo is but a small portion of the crowd around the embassy.

The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 1973.
Bin im Garten The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 1973.

In 1977, the Harrison & Abramovitz building reopened. Today the building (with renovations that were completed in 1997) houses the U.S. Interests Section, whose functions, according to their website, are "Consular Services, a Political and Economic Section, a Public Diplomacy Program, and Refugee Processing unique to Cuba."

The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 1977.
U.S. Department of State The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 1977.

In 2006, as the BBC reported at the time, Fidel Castro installed 132 black flags outside the building, which blocked an electronic sign with scrolling messages on the building that started the month before.

The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 2006.
Flickr/glichfield The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 2006.

The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 2008.
Flickr/UdoSpringfeld The Harrison & Abramovitz building in 2008.